Interior Painting "Cutting IN" techniques


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Old 10-01-03, 04:57 PM
Kelly Ferguson
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Interior Painting "Cutting IN" techniques

I have looked in books, magazines, on-line, everywhere I can think of and have been unable to find a workable answer. Here goes. How in the world do we, as painters, get that ever perfect cut in line from wall to ceiling (different paint colors). My husband and I just finished a 5000 sq. ft home and we had a time getting that straight line everytime. We tried every tool and every kind of tape made available that we know of. My husband also caulked the ceiling lines, to no avail. When we taped, the paint bled through, when we free handed it the lines were wavey. Please send us some tricks of the trade, they would be grately appreciated. thank you From one painter to another.
 
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Old 10-01-03, 05:55 PM
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Cutting in is one of those things that you should practice on scrap board as much as possible. It may not seem possible to get that straight line now ut it will happen. I have the shakiest hands known to man and I have been able to work around that with a few little techniques. First I would invest in a high quality 1 1/2" angled sash brush. What I do is load the brush with about 1/4 of the bristles worth with a high quality paint. (sherwin williams superpaint or benjamin moore). Hold the brush so you are looking at the top of the brush. Press the brush about an inch away from whatever edge you are trying to get to until the bristles fan out and just about reach the edge. Slowly follow that line. this will create a nice bead of paint neat the edge. What tends to happen is you may get almost a scalloped edge (wavy). If this happens simply reapeat the process using longer strokes. This will in turn straighted out the bead of paint.
I hope this helped a little. It is very difficult to write about without actually showing. I would practice still on an old piece of wood though. Best of luck to you.
 
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Old 10-01-03, 07:06 PM
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To achieve a nice, clean, straight line at the intersection of wall and ceiling, I do it like this.

Starting about 1" down from the ceiling on the wall, start your brush stroke. Then stroke it again closer, and then closer, using the same brushload of paint, working your way upto the ceiling. At the very intersection, I wrap the paint up onto the ceiling just a hair. Not even 1/32", just a hair. This way, if you look straight up at the ceiling, you might see a hair of color on the ceiling, but step back and look at the line, and it will look razor-sharp and straight as an arrow.

Hope that helps.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 10:59 AM
mudder
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my two cents I use a 3 1/2 inch brush. If youre a golfer you'll understand - keep both your feet planted and look ahead of the brush 2 to 3 inches. Works for me!
 
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Old 10-04-03, 09:27 PM
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i make a living painting and i can do some nice straight line cuts but from ceiling to wall is always the hardest especially if the colors are drastic.in most homes the corners are not straight and have up and down dips and/or peaks and valleys.if you were to put a lazer level to the ceiling and paint to that, some paint would ride up on the ceiling and some may be below the top of the wall line.so to pull this off doing it free hand takes practice,patience, and a good eye.here is what you should do to get that laser looking straight line.paint the ceiling letting the cut come down onto the wall half an inch or more.let the ceiling dry overnight.now get some 'white' low tack painters tape,you will not find a better tape than this to get a fine line!now focus on just the cut line for the tops of all the walls.tape a section of the ceiling from wall to wall,dont follow any curves in the corner with the tape just stretch the tape tight and only follow the basic line from wall to ceiling.run a fingernail across the tape edge to firmly set it.now cut it in using what is called a dry brush.let me explain that.take a dipped brush and brush it out maybe an inch from the ceiling getting most of the paint off the brush, then with this dry brush,brush into the tape.by doing this you dont give excess paint a chance to creep under the tape which is the number one cause for taping not to work well,people take a dip with the brush and mush it right onto the tape and all that excess paint gets sucked under the tape...having done a corner to corner section pull the tape.then repeat this around the room.now you will have a nice cut line around the room which you can follow when you paint the wall or just cut close to it .)you pick it we stick it!
 
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Old 10-04-03, 09:41 PM
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oh i just reread your post where you said you guys caulked the corner where wall meets ceiling.i give that a big thumbs up.it will help smooth out rough spots and benefit the taped line.that is a common practice for my company and the type of work we do.(man those painters sure are an anal bunch!!)
 
 

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