Painting Over Wallpaper


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Old 10-02-03, 05:34 AM
chocolate
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Question Painting Over Wallpaper

I HAVE A QUESTION REGARDING PAINTING OVER WALLPAPER, I HAVE A SPARE BEDROOM THAT CURRENTLY HAS A DARK COLOR WALLPAPER ON IT, I WANT TO PAINT OVER IT A ORANGE OVER AND IM WANTING TO KNOW IF I SHOW PRIME FIRST, I DONT WANT TO TAKE THE PAPER DOWN BECAUSE IT WOULD BE TO MUCH WORK
 
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Old 10-02-03, 07:52 AM
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LOL....I like your post Chocolate....."it would be too much work", I respect people who don't beat around the bush!! With that said though I would rip the paper down. It is not as bad as you may think. A solution of DIF and hot water and and putty knife is all you need. Follow the directions on the container and go to town. If you are totaly against taking down the paper then yes you do need to prime. You also want to make sure any part of the paper that is pealing needs to be re-applied. -Good Luck
 
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Old 10-02-03, 09:40 AM
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It is always better to remove the wallpaper.

Prime the wallpaper with a top quality primer - sealer, such as: Zinsser 123, then paint with a top quality acrylic, latex paint.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-02-03, 05:27 PM
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ALWAYS REMOVE THE PAPER.

If you start to prime/paint it and it bubbles, it must be removed.

If you MUST paint it, use an oil-based primer to lock it down, avoiding nightmares for the next guy to come along and work on the wall.
 
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Old 10-02-03, 11:46 PM
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If it starts to bubble with wet paint..Wont the bubbles dry back as the paint dries?
 
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Old 10-03-03, 02:13 AM
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The reason I ask this is because when I paint over plain lining paper
(which is the same as the backing on wallpapers) the blisters dry back after a couple of hours..
I can understand them not drying back if the wallpaper is in bad condition or not hung properly in the first place but thats about it..
Another example of painting over wallpaper is anaglypta..Again..Its just plain paper that has had a pattern pressed into it. You can still find victorian anaglypta that has been continually painted...To this day.. The victorian bubbles still appear when the paper is wet though!!

 
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Old 10-03-03, 06:16 AM
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The porosity of lining paper makes it somewhat different from what is generally considered wallpaper. It is probably more akin to bridging material which is intended to be painted. Anaglypta is designed to be painted, so there is some difference there.

I believe that the prevailing sense is that wallpaper can be painted, it is just not a good idea in the long run.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 07:11 AM
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Vinyl is not at all porous yet wallpaper companies have been producing blown vinyl wallcoverings for years..These types of paperbacked vinyls were produced to be used as wallpaper and then painted over if required. Lining paper has had no special treatment to make it paintable...Its just paper..Same with anaglypta..



I am trying to understand why it is never been ok and "frowned upon"to paint a good quality well papered wall...
In my experiance I have had an awful lot of customers ask me to do this type of work because they have just wanted the place to look fresher/cleaner. There have been many times when I have advised against this because the paper on the walls were not up to it..
The ones that I have agreed to do have worked out fine and most people would have thought that the place had been totall lined throughout.


Im not trying to argue for the sake of argument,I promise!!

Lets just call it the "great, painted wallpaper debate"!!
 
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Old 10-03-03, 09:19 AM
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The reason you dont paint over wallpaper is a) the seams will show, b) any loose parts of the paper will blister, c) wall paper may, in the future, come loose from the wall.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 10:32 AM
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And if you ever need to repair the wall itself it turns that minor job into a nightmare. The moisture from the patching compound can loosen the paper, making the patch larger, and more paper loosens...
Stripping alkyd painted wallpaper from drywall usually damages the drywall badly enough to require skim coating. Stripping from plaster requires using a 3 inch razor knife. Call around; I am the only one in my area crazy enough to even take the job of stripping painted wallpaper. I do make sure it is profitable.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 01:08 PM
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So by that I take it that you would never cross line a dry wall then??

Painted wall paper on a plastered wall is a dream to strip dry if the blade is changed every 2/3 strips.
It slices off so easy,it doesn`t even leave a scar.. Different story on an unprimed dry wall but certain papers are a nightmare to strip where ever they were hung..Thats life.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 01:08 PM
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I suggested to remove the paper if it bubbles because:

If it bubbles, then it shows it would be easy to remove. Also, yes the bubbles will dry back down, but that means the paper lost adhesion to the wall, and has become unstable IMO.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 04:16 PM
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Im glad that you brought this up!!
Paper that has been soaked/booked for the correct amout of time can still blister/bubble..We have all seen it right?

The truth is that if the bubbles dry back when the paper has been booked correctly then there is nothing more to do except than watch it stretch back like a drum..
How does this affect the total adhesion of the paper??....Hopefully the mere mention of blisters appearing in 50+ year old anyglypta/lyncrusta wallcovering when wet will put an end to that theory.

The reason you dont paint over wallpaper is a) the seams will show, b) any loose parts of the paper will blister, c) wall paper may, in the future, come loose from the wall.
I would agree with that..In part. If indeed the seams were lifting in places then it shows that the decorator responsible for hanging it did a sub standard job..You have a choice...Either relax the seams and stick em back or... strip the lot,prep and blah blah blah.... If its the gaps in seams that you are worried about,how long does it take to fill them with some flexible filler after priming?..The latter certainly makes sence if the plaster underneath is shott and needs major repair.

If the plaster needs major repair then best advise your customer to first get in some laborers to hack off old plaster..Then advise them to employ a plasterer to give them a brand new wall finish.

Many professional plasterers will only skim over brand new dry lining so bare that in mind too..
 

Last edited by toptosher; 10-03-03 at 04:51 PM.
 

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