Type of paint


  #1  
Old 11-07-03, 07:49 AM
kmalone3
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Type of paint

Is there a problem with using HD Behr paint?

We are currently painting a 14x16 room (kitchen) that has 2 skylights and 6 foot window with southern exposure. We want to paint the room evergreen and a light brown. Are there recommedations for flat vs semi-gloss? Are there recommedations for the use of two colors?
 
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Old 11-07-03, 08:51 AM
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Behr paint gets a lot of bad press here. I prefer Valspar, Benjamin Moore, Pratt&Lambert.

Flat paint for walls, semi-gloss for woodwork are the rules of thumb.

Color choices are personal. I stay away from that.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-07-03, 02:30 PM
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I've test-driven Behr products about 10 times, and had nothing but miserable experiences with it.
 
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Old 11-07-03, 05:27 PM
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Interesting...I'm currently using Behr in a bathroom. Seems fine. Excellant cover over a contrasting paint. I had always used Benjamin Moore until Consumer Reports said Behr was rated #1. I can't argue with the results.

As to the sheen, I'd recommend "egg shell". It has just a bit more sheen than flat, but not as glossy as satin or semigloss.

Hope this helps !
 
  #5  
Old 11-08-03, 09:13 AM
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I have used Behr paint on a few jobs because of homeowner preference and it was "ok". It certainly is not the best but of course you could do much worse. If it works for you then great. I found it a bit on the thin and grainy side and needed 2 very thick coats for good coverage. You should always do 2 coats no matter the paint however I felt as if I had to spend a little more time than normal acheiving the right coverage on that second coat. For 22$ a gallon it is not bad however if you catch Sherwin Williams on a sale or if you ask you can get there superpaint for maybe 24$ which is a FAR superior paint. Ben Moore is in my opinion the best but not worth the 8$ more a gallon over SW.

I would not go with a semi or a flat for the walls. I would recommend satin or eggshell as they will be easier to clean over the flat but not be shiny as the semi. I would go flat for the ceiling because it will not get dirty (probably) and many people do not like the ceiling to have a sheen. I would go satin for the the walls and semi for the trim for cleanability.

I am an artist so I have a decent eye for color however I do not understand your question about color. Are you painting different wall different caolors or the trim different? If you give me a bit more info and links to the colors I can give you my OPINION however yours may vary as it is very subjective. Best of luck to you.

I also (again in my opinion) would not hold Consumer Reports opinions as the be all end all. Some of their recommendations seem a bit sketchy at times. Behr better than SW or BM is definately a case in point.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 01:09 PM
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beware that green can be tough

Pros will avoid Behr unless forced to use it by the h/o. Years ago I used to believe in CR, too. But that changed years ago. Some of their testing may be ok, but they allow a lot of subjective opinions to make it into hte articles and its hard to discren what is objective and what is subjective.

Best value is one such value. To me, Behr is not the best value. Sherwin Williams is a far better value.

If you are going with a green, then I recommend getting your paint from a paint store. I also want to caution you to expect at least two coats. If "evergreen" is a light green, you may be ok with two coats. If its a medium or darker green, you may need 3 or even 4 coats.

For anyone using medium to dark colors, I recommend priming first. Have the pimer tinted gray. You'll get better results.
Also use top quality brushes and roller sleeves.

Sheen - I only use flat on a ceiling or walls in rooms that are little used. Satin is preferable. I also prefer semi-gloss in bathrooms/kitchens. That is a personal preference - not everyone likes the shine of a semi-gloss. Semi-gloss shows more flaws than satin. Flat shows the least flaws, but is the hardest to clean.
 
  #7  
Old 11-08-03, 01:15 PM
kmalone3
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Our walls are 12 ft high. We have 4 ft of antique white wains coating. We were considering painting the stove/ sink area (1 1/12walls) the Sherwin Williams grey and the rest of the area dark hunter green. Should we use the eggshell for both the green and grey or should the darker color be satin? We tried semi-gloss with the Behr evergreen and it gave off way too much light & shine.

Also, we have already washed the walls w/ tsp, primed it, and painted one of the walls with the Behr semi-gloss evergreen. With the new similar color, different sheen, do we need to wash it and prime it again?
 
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Old 11-08-03, 04:09 PM
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I'd stick with the egg shell for both colors. If you didn't like the sheen of semigloss, you won't like "satin". It's very close to semi.

To prepare the wall you already painted, I'd rough it up with some fine sandpaper just to take some of the sheen off. Then wipe it down to remove the dust. No need to prime.

Hunter Green walls... boy you are daring. Sounds nice!
 
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Old 11-08-03, 07:16 PM
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You asked three questions but sometimes the answers can become complicated or subjective. For your kitchen, I'd suggest a pearl (low-semigloss) or a semigloss finish for the durability and scrubbability of the smoother, 'shinier' finish. A flat finish is rather 'chalky', porous, and easily rubbed away when cleaning it. As for your choice of 'hunter green', be sure to use a gray-tinted primer beneath it, as this will provide you with a dull, dead basecoat...the dark, deep green will not cover very well of it's own accord...it's somewhat inherently translucent, so going over gray will help, whereas going over let's say, white, would be very bright, high in chroma and harder to cover with an inky sorta color like deep green...When you pro-rate the cost of painting your home, I'd go with the advice of the experts here and buy the best you can afford. You'll get better scrubbabilty, depth of color, ease of application and less fade than the 'cheaper brands'. Surveys and comparisons will always be relative. Experience and knowledge can be invaluable tools in any endeavour. I swear by Benjamin Moore paints and Zinsser primers. Time spent prepping your project, gray-tinted primers where recommended and good quality tools will make your results what you hoped they could be.

Keith
 

Last edited by KeithP; 11-08-03 at 07:26 PM.
  #10  
Old 11-09-03, 12:35 PM
kmalone3
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I went to Sherwin Williams today and am fairly confident we are going to use their paint. Next question is which type to use? The gentleman at the store was talking either Classic, Super, or Cashmere. He was somewhat pushing the Super; however, he stated that the Classic 99 was a common bought brand and that his boss swore by the Cashmere.

He also recommended to use the satin finish, rough up the current semi-gloss wall with sandpaper(as recommended by several others), prime the wall again because other walls the same color are not painted yet. Agree?
 
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Old 11-09-03, 03:47 PM
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Do not use any other sheen glossier than egg shell on walls or ceilings.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 04:17 PM
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all three are good

Did you talk to them about your color choices? Choosing a drak color like hunter green may limit your choice(s) because of the amount of pigment in it. One or more of the choices may not be available in a deep tint base.

As you can tell, sheen is a personal choice.
To my eye, satin is not close to semi-gloss in sheen but is halfway between flat and semi-gloss. To my eye, satin and egg shell are very close. As stated earlier, I prefer semi-gloss in a kitchen. It is easier to clean. However, since you are choosing a dark color, I suggest you go with the satin. Getting the green to look good will be hard enough. Satin will hide flaws better than semi-gloss.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 06:37 PM
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The guy at SW gave you sound advice. I would definately go for satin on the walls and flat for the ceiling, semi (if painting) for trim. I would opt for the superpaint. I have tried the classic which is good, but the super is worth the extra few bucks definately. Cashmir is good also. Look at the paint specs and see which one appeals to you. Certain ones are easier to clean than others. SW has a chart that rates all of their products in different categories. Go for the one that fits you needs. Good Luck
 
  #14  
Old 11-10-03, 10:50 AM
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Type of Paint

I painted my kitchen with Benjamin Moore semi-gloss in 1989. It still looks great.

We have more recently used Velsparís American Tradition paint, an it seems fine.

I have also used Sherwin Williams on the exterior of the house, and I am very happy with it. Their Super paint is quite good. I like it quite a bit.

I am not sure about Behr paint. CR ranked it first in this years tests. Last year it did not fair as well. Could the paint improve that much in one year?
 
  #15  
Old 11-10-03, 11:15 AM
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I am not a pro by any stretch of the imagination, but I am a do-it-yourselfer as far as painting goes (my Husband does all the rest of the home repair) I have used a myriad of painting products and have come to several conclusions, some of which may not be popular. But here they are.

I have just finished painting my kitchen for the second time in just two months, the first time was with Behr brand paint at about $23/gallon. I didn't care for the color, It certainly did not match the sample, it looked blotchy at best and the fact that it needed a third coat even though I primed 2 coats of zinser was very irritating. Behr is VERY thick and seemed to slide a bit if it wasn't spread real thin on the walls.
The second painting (about a month later) was a different color and with True Value brand at about $12/gallon. It covered in just 2 coats and was easier to apply than the Behr. The color is true and looks uniformly consitent.

I hear a lot of people saying Egg Shell finish is the best. In some cases I agree, but not in all. In low light areas, or rooms without a good amount of natual light, a satin finish is a blessing. The soft sheen can give a nice reflective quality to what little light is present, giving the room a brighter, cleaner look. I do agree that ceilings look best in a matt or Egg shell finish, but widen your horizons a little...a few different textures in a room, even if it's from your paint, can give your room a whole new element of style.
 
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Old 11-10-03, 11:56 AM
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dferrante: 1) Goes to show variability of Behr quality and 2) another reason I don't put much stock in CR's opinions.

Deepfreeze: What color was the Behr paint and what color was the True Value brand? The color has a big impact on the results.
Thanks for the input on sheens and decorating.
 
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Old 11-10-03, 04:10 PM
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As for the consumer reports issue, please let me quote a fellow hanger/painter from the NGPP, Jim Parodi. He says it all, and I highly agree.

QUOTE
"I just finished reading the Consumer Reports roundup of interior paints.
As usual it is written from the DIY perspective and offers little for
the professional. And as usual, I reject most of the criteria used to
judge these paints:

Major problem #1--- Once again CU only chooses the national brands. I
understand why, since it does the DIYer little good to get stoked about
a paint if they can't get it in their state. But the omission of great
regional brands is a fatal error and renders this seemingly
"comprehensive" roundup a complete failure. Maybe when they include
Coronado, Porter, Muralo, Touraine, and so many others it will be worth
a revisit.

Problem #2--- Would it be too obvious to point out that the most
important aspect in our superficial trade is "HOW DOES IT LOOK?" CU
spends a millisecond on this subject and cubbyholes this into "Does it
appear flatter than advertised or glossier than advertised." "Does it
go on smoothly" This is important to the DIYer because they are always
newbies. Pros are familiar with sheen levels after one or two jobs and
aren't surprised by sheen. "Brush glide" (smooth application) is nice,
but even if a paint is less user friendly, pros will usually find a way
around it---or ignore it completely if they think the finished product
is worth the extra effort.

Problem # 3- Hiding and Mildew Resistance are nice. But once again if
a paint gives a better appearance with two coats pros will use it.
(DIYers want a one coat so they can get back to football on TV.) And
scrubbability? CU does not even get into the newer "flat enamels" or
ceramics. Muralo Ultra Ceramic, Pratt &Lambert Accolade, Coronado Cerama
Gard are regional and therefore not mentioned.

Problem # 4-- Do the words "leveling", "flashing", "blocking", "edge
cling", "sagging", "enamel holdout", "recoat time", "cure time", mean
anything to you? Of course they do-you're a pro. They mean nothing to
a DIYer so CU completely ignores these ESSENTIAL paint qualities in
their review.

Problem # 5--- Such a bunch of paint yokels I haven't seen in recent
memory...Did anybody see the word PRIMER mentioned at all? Yes CU,
paint companies have these things that go on first and these things are
part of the "system" than can make or break a job. So with primers you
can tackle painting garbage painted atrium halls with uniform finish and
get good PROFESSIONAL results over patching compounds.

This review is a joke for the pro. Take it and send it to your DIY
relative."




Behr is VERY thick and seemed to slide a bit if it wasn't spread real thin on the walls.
Yep, been there with their 'flat enamel' that wasn't even close to flat, but very shiny.
 
  #18  
Old 11-10-03, 05:51 PM
Deepfreeze
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BobF..
Deepfreeze: What color was the Behr paint and what color was the True Value brand? The color has a big impact on the results.
The Behr was a soft Yellow called Cashmere Sweater.
The True Value was mixed from a Behr swatch, it was a soft icy blue called Spring ****something****(the name escapes me)
 
 

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