2 very basic painting questions for the pro's

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Old 11-09-03, 04:52 PM
Nucleus
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2 very basic painting questions for the pro's

I have 2 basic questions for you pro's out there!

1. I know that your goal is wet paint on wet paint. However, how do you achieve this goal with a ceiling or very high walls?

2. When I had to touch up a wall and ceiling, the job came out EXTREMEMLY poor. The outer edge of my touchup showed EVERY roller edge or brush edge. It created like a dull perimiter, but the inside looked fine. How do you touch up a wall without showing the outer marks?

Thanks for the tips!
 
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Old 11-09-03, 06:00 PM
mikejmerritt
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Hello Nucleus, on say a crew of three, you can always find a way to keep a wet edge if thats a factor. If cutting is tedious put two brushing, one rolling or two rolling and one brushing. Another thing that helps is to be certain that everything is ready to paint before you start. All patching, sanding, caulking and cleaning up should be finished before you open a paint can. It can take some hopping around to keep a wet edge and we use long and short rolling sticks (thats what we call them but it looks kinda funny typed out).

Lapping will happen more often when changing colors and attempting to get by with one coat. We almost don't worry about lapping because its so much easier to put two coats than to try to make one do it. The cooler it is the better and no fans.

When working at home alone or with little help it takes some preparation. Have the ladders etc. ready and check to make sure you can reach the difficult areas.

I can assure you that there are paints that will not touch up no matter what you do. We use a roller to touch up where we rolled and a brush around the edges feathering everything we can. If that doesn't do it we just paint it again. It happens to DIY'ers many times because they didn't box (mix) all the paint together before they started or were touching up out of the bottom a can.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 06:18 PM
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I wish we could have someone cutting in closely followed by someone rolling, but that just doesn't happen. I would say that our roll-out meshes with our cut-in because of the way its brushed. I brush on the cut-in thick enough to cover, but feather it out on the edge to be rolled. And when i roll, I feather the roller into the cut-in. It also helps to cut in the smallest amount as possible and roll in as close as possible. For example, around a window frame, I generally cut-in about 1 1/2" from the frame out, and roll in to about 1/2" from the frame, resulting in 1" or less overlap. Less overlap, less chance of 'flashing'. And this can't be taught, it just comes with experience behind the roller.

As for the flashing that you had, I would assume you were using egg-shell, or satin type paints. Flashing rarely occurs on good quality flat paint. If its builders flat, (30%-60% water) flashing will occur. I try to avoid flashing by feathering it out as much as possible. If I need to touch up a 2"x2" spot, I will use a 4" roller, (Wooster jumbocoater is my fav), use the least amount paint as possible, (dip roller, roll out on cardboard before hitting the wall), and roll out the touch up working outwards from it until the roller is dry. This results in a highly feathered area about 2'x2'. If it was a one-coat wall, you don't want an area that is obviously two-coated.

Also, it depends on how old the paint is. If its been over 30 days, I will inform the customer that this touch up might not cure down and look the same as the existing paint. Temp, humidity, smokers, etc. will make the paint cure down and appear slightly different. And some paint takes upto 30 days to FULLY and TRULY cure. Yes, this includes latex paints too. So even though the touch up is flashing now, if properly applied, and the paint is the same can, it might look fine in a couple days, or even weeks. But this only applies to being properly applied.

Hope this helped.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 06:20 PM
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I just read Mike's post, and he makes a good point. Box the paint ALWAYS, and if your cut in can is getting empty, fill it back up. Tiny pieces of tinting can get stuck to the sides, and discolor your cut in.
 
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Old 11-10-03, 08:51 AM
Nucleus
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Originally posted by prowallguy
As for the flashing that you had, I would assume you were using egg-shell, or satin type paints. Flashing rarely occurs on good quality flat paint. If its builders flat, (30%-60% water) flashing will occur.

The paint that I was using was Behr egg-shell finish.

I try to avoid flashing by feathering it out as much as possible. If I need to touch up a 2"x2" spot, I will use a 4" roller, (Wooster jumbocoater is my fav), use the least amount paint as possible, (dip roller, roll out on cardboard before hitting the wall), and roll out the touch up working outwards from it until the roller is dry. This results in a highly feathered area about 2'x2'.

I tried this, but only got a wider perimiter of "flashing". Maybe, it was just my technique, but I kept rolling until there was nothing left. I ended up re-painting the whole wall!
BTW, is Osgood the answer?
 
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Old 11-10-03, 03:53 PM
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The paint that I was using was Behr egg-shell finish.
IMO= Junque

That stuff will probably flash forever. Some people like it. I have had ZERO good experiences with it. I would repaint the whole wall, or a section of it if possible. Also, keep an eye on it, it might cure down better, but I highly doubt it.





BTW, is Osgood the answer?
That remains to be seen, but I hope so.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 10:54 AM
JaydesGrandma
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IMO=Junque
Who do 'you' like?
 
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Old 11-20-03, 01:52 PM
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Who do 'you' like?
I like Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams, Porter, Coronado, Muralo, Pratt & Lambert, & MAB amongst others. The type or brand of paint I prefer to use depends on the application or conditions I'm facing with each individual job.

It just seems that due to the current popularity of box stores like HD and Lowes, that many people are using inferior paints because the stores signed a contract with the manufacturer or supplier and the kids working in these places know nothing else but to recommend what they have been told. Paints like Behr and Ralph Laren, just for example, have their time and place, but under most instances I've used them, they performed miserably.

This is all just my opinion, everyone has their favorites, and is comfortable with specifc products.

I see an overwhelming amount of DIYers here post that they are having a hard time or problems with a paint that they got at HD. This results from improper prep, application, or just plain wrong product for the situation. If HD and Lowes had a more 'experienced' staff, maybe the right recommendations would be made. I had a guy tell me at HD that I was buying the wrong paint for my deck. He said he knew, he'd been selling paint for 30 years. Maybe thats why he was selling, and I am applying.
 
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