Patching small screw holes in cabinet doors

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Old 11-17-03, 10:37 AM
kdkrone
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Patching small screw holes in cabinet doors

Hi. We are going to change handles on kitchen cabinet doors necessitating filling the holes for the old handle screws. I would appreciate advice on how to get the smoothest, most flat patch possible: materials (wood filler versus putty), how to best apply them, sanding advice. Too often I have seen that the patches are very obvious despite attempts to make them smooth.

Thanks
Ken K
 
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Old 11-17-03, 12:12 PM
C
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I have done some of these with equal results cosmetically. Drill the hole to a standard dowel size, glue, trim, putty, sand and finish. If there will be another hole drilled hard by the one you are repairing, you will not have to worry about structural problems later.

Using filler is slower because it takes so long for it to dry in a substanital hole. A dowel is ready to trim flush in 30 minutes, tops.Fill it in layers as recommended by the manufacturer, let the last layer crown over a bit so you can sand it flush. Final sanding 180 or more.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-17-03, 12:20 PM
kdkrone
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Thank you. I had not thought about using a dowel, even for a small hole, but that makes lots of sense. The other holes are not nearby but I like the idea of such a solid filling in of the hole.

Ken K
 
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Old 11-17-03, 12:36 PM
kdkrone
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What is the smoothest sandable material to use for the final fill-in? Would it be unreasonable to use joint topping compound?

KK
 
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Old 11-17-03, 01:59 PM
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If your new holes won't be near the filled ones, I would use non-shrinking spackle. 2 applications, sand and its done.
 
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Old 11-18-03, 09:14 AM
brickeyee
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Dowels are end grain and very difficult to finish to match edge grain. If the cabinets are painted it is not as much of an issue. For small repairs I typically use minwax filler, then break out the colored markers. I have around 50 shades of brown. You can continue grain across the repair, then cover with some lacquer and buff repair to match the rest of the finish. For really small holes (< 1/16 inch) mix colored putty to match and fill the holes. Repairs at eye level are the hardest since you look at them from a very short distance.
 
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Old 11-18-03, 12:49 PM
kdkrone
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brickeyee

These holes are in off-white cabinets and are just the size of 8 x 1 1/4" bolts for the handles, 2 in each door.

I thought I would recess the dowels, cover with spackle, sand, and paint.

What do you think?
 
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Old 11-19-03, 01:52 PM
brickeyee
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Use the minwax high performance wood filler. It is softer than wood and will easily sand down flush with the surrounding surface. After 1 coat of paint the repair will be invisible. I use the stuff to repair old moldings that have been damaged, to the point of shaping it with carverís chisels. The patches are perfect. The biggest drawback is that the stuff stinks while it is curing.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 04:42 PM
kdkrone
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"The biggest drawback is that the stuff stinks while it is curing."


Can't be any worse than a bad patch looks!

Thanks. I greatly appreciate your advice.

Ken K
 
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