Clear Glaze

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  #1  
Old 12-08-03, 01:53 PM
sir_jeffrence
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Clear Glaze

I have a wall that has sandwash paint on it and it needs a coat of clear glaze. My question is Is there any special preparation I need to take putting the clear glaze on? Is it no different than putting a coat of paint on? Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 12-09-03, 05:13 AM
Doyle Self
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Doing a glaze is much different than painting. If your sruface is not sealed up you will not have enough open time with the glaze. I am not sure what you are going over. But you will need a sealed surface. Satin, eggshell or semi gloss.
Also I do not under stand about putting on a clear glaze. the only reason to apply a glaze would be to add color. Are you refering to a sealer?
Doyle
 
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Old 12-09-03, 05:58 AM
sir_jeffrence
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So if you were to paint a wall with sandwash paint, is the glaze supposed to be mixed in with the paint? This is for someone else so maybe I'm not getting my facts straight. I'm under the impression that the wall was primed then painted with sandwash paint and now needs a coat of clear glaze to protect it. Is that proper procedure for sandwash paint or is there another way its supposed to be done? Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 12-09-03, 11:14 AM
B
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not sure of the terminology

I think there's some confusion over the terminology. Different countries and even different parts of one country will have different meanings for the same term and different terms for the same meaning.

First - what do you mean by sandwash paint? To me, that is paint with sand-like particles in it to give a rough texture to the walls. Is that it or do you mean a certain color? Or perhaps a "style of paint" such as Ralph Lauren's suede paint?

Second - I'm not sure what you mean by glaze. Glazes are usually used in faux finishes. Like Doyle said, a glaze will change the color. A glaze goes over a painted surface. Is the glaze supposed to protect the sandwash? Where did you hear/read that you needed a glaze over the sandwash? Again, I'm reading it the same as Dolye - that you want to protect the sandwash?

Perhaps its best if you tell us what you have done and what you want to accomplish.

To answer your question though without fully knowing what you have - read the instructions on the can. If you want a faux finish then post back for more instructions.
 
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Old 12-09-03, 04:03 PM
sir_jeffrence
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Like I said, this is for someone else so as far as I know, I'm not sure what they meant by sandwash paint but I know that they wanted a clear glaze to protect it. If this doesn't tell you enough then I'll get more information. Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 12-13-03, 08:51 AM
sir_jeffrence
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OK the term clear glaze was incorrect. The coating they were talking about was a waterbased clear polyutherene used to protect sandwash paint. Are there any special preparations to watch out for putting this on a wall? I've never put on polyutherene on a wall and want to make sure its done right the first time.
 
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Old 12-13-03, 05:57 PM
B
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Never heard of anyone putting poly on a wall

Never heard of anyone putting poly on a wall before. There are finishes to put over glazes to protect them. I've not had the occasion to use one, so I'm not much help. But it sounds like "sandwash" is similar to a glaze.
 
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Old 12-13-03, 06:19 PM
sir_jeffrence
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I had never heard of putting poly on a wall either until now. The product is Behr Premium Plus Crystal Clear Water Based Polyutherane. It is used after painting with Behr Premium Plus Sandwash paint. I was really hoping that maybe someone had used it before and had some tips on applying it. Thanks.
 
  #9  
Old 12-17-03, 08:45 AM
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Not having used this product, but knowing the performance of this manufacturer's other products, I wopuld suggest applying the poly very lightly. A thin coat with a 3/8" nap. Instead of 1 thick coat, try 2 or more very thin coats.

The only concern in applying poly to a wall is the leveling properties of poly tend to make it sag if put on too thick. Thin thin thin is the key here, and keep an eye on the wall as its drying, catching any runs or sags before they dry too much to touch-up effectively.
 
  #10  
Old 12-17-03, 10:19 AM
sir_jeffrence
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I rolled using a 1/4 inch nap.....it was really a pain cause the sandwash paint really soaked it up so it was a slow and tedious process......a second coat is possibly going to be needed to acheive maximum protection.....would it be advisable to sand lightly before putting on a second coat? Thanks.
 
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Old 12-17-03, 05:34 PM
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I wouldnt sand it, just recoat it.
 
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