Painting bathroom floor tiles

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Old 01-31-04, 03:49 PM
miketesta
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Painting bathroom floor tiles

Hello all,

Rather than go through the expense and time of replacing our bathroom floor tiles (which are an ugly dark brown), we'd like to know if repainting them is a viable alternative. I'd appreciate your perspectives on how well painted floor tiles will wear in a damp environment; longevity before having to repaint again; preparation procedures; which materials, primer and paint types or brands work best; which tools to use (rollers, brushes, other tools); and what to do about the grout.

Thanks,
Mike
 
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Old 01-31-04, 08:15 PM
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Scuff the tiles real good with 80-120 grit sandpaper, or steel wool. Clean it with TSP and rinse thoroughly. Give it 2 coats of Pratt & Lambert Palgard Epoxy.

Its a two component paint, mix the 2 parts, preferably with the mechanical shaker at the paint store, and use after standing for one hour.

Brush in the edges with a natural bristle brush, and use a 3/8" nap to roll out the body.

This stuff smells real strong, but is durable as they come. Will withstand high traffic, and standing water, chemicals, etc.

Buy a throwaway brush and nap, they won't be able to be cleaned out when done.

All cleanup must be done with laquer thinner. Allow at least 16 hours between coats, and before using after final coat.

If you would like to use something a little more user friendly, and a little less toxic, use Pratt & Lambert Tech-Gard Waterborne Epoxy. Allow at least 8 hours between coats, and 24 hours before use. Clean up is with soap and water.

I have never used the waterborne version myself, but have heard alot of good things about it.

Between the two, the Palgard has 50% solids by volume, compared to 37% solids for the waterborne, and dries at 2.0 mils thick, telling me the palgard will be more durable and probably last longer.

I have used the palgard for commercial applications, shower stalls at rec centers, bathroom floors in offices, etc., and havent seen a failure yet.

Neither require a primer if the surface is prepped accordingly.

My 2 cents
 
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Old 02-01-04, 09:13 AM
miketesta
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Thanks for your good information and suggestions Prowallguy. After the epoxy is dried should I somehow paint the grout, or scrape away the epoxy that's between the tiles? Or should I just leave that covered with the epoxy also?
 
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Old 02-01-04, 09:50 AM
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Just leave it painted. No reason to expose the grout. I imagine trying to scrape out the grout lines would be pretty tough to do, and jeopardize the stabilty of the finish.

I also forgot to mention in the post above, that after washing and rinsing, run a tack cloth over it to remove all the small particles and dust.
 
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