ceiling bubbles!


  #1  
Old 05-12-04, 01:31 PM
flynch
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ceiling bubbles!

I'm painting a house that I just bought. The house was built in the 1950's and I'm not sure when it was last painted.
In one of the bedrooms I get bubling when I paint, in a couple of places the bubling actually burst, and so I'm going through the process of sanding down, spacking and repainting.
what could be causing this bubling?
Am I doing the right thing by sanding down spackling and repainting?
Can anyone offer any suggestions?
Thanks!
--Frank
 
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Old 05-12-04, 10:43 PM
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could you describe the bubbles more? Big or small? Is it the new paint or old layer also coming up?
 
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Old 05-13-04, 04:11 AM
B
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location?

More questions....

1. What prep did you do before painting the first time?
2. Is the bubbling close to an outside wall?
3. What is the condition of the ceiling under the bubbles?
 
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Old 05-13-04, 07:55 AM
flynch
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> could you describe the bubbles more?
> Big or small?
> Is it the new paint or old layer also coming up?
> 1. What prep did you do before painting the first time?
> 2. Is the bubbling close to an outside wall?
> 3. What is the condition of the ceiling under the bubbles?

Before I started painting in that room, I took a look at the ceiling and I noticed a couple of patches where the paint had come away in the past, it had been sanded down and painted over. I also noticed some places where the existing pain was bubbling out. So I got out my scraper, and hacked away at the ceiling, sanded it down, and spackled it so that there wouldn't be a noticable difference in thickness of the paint.
Then when I applied the paint new bubbles appeared. When they burst, I noticed that both the old paint and the new paint is coming away! The bubbles vary in size, some are quite large (about 6 inches in diameter).
This is happening in two areas of the ceiling, one is right beside an outside wall, the other section is about 10 feet from an exterior wall.
I don't really know how to answer your question about the condition of the ceiling - what should I be looking for? The ceiling looks ok to my untrained eye, it doesn't appear to be soft or rotted, there is no obvious waves or sagging going on.

On a related note, should I be applying primer after I spackle or is it ok to just paint over the spackle.
thanks again!
--Frank
 
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Old 05-13-04, 09:04 AM
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To answer the last question first, you should apply some sort of primer over patches. The patch will absorb paint at a different rate than a painted surface, giving a dull spot, or 'flashing'.

For the bubbles, I can think of 2 reasons why this would happen.
1. The last time it was painted, the paint was applied over a dirty or dusty surface. Dust from drywall patches will keep paint from adhering. (When you peeled off the bubbles, was the back of the peel dusty or sparkly with joint compound dust residue?)

2. Most likely scenario: Latex paint was applied over oil paint and didn't adhere. How to fix this? Thats the hard part. Peel away everything that you possibly can. Then apply a slow-drying heavy-bodied long oil primer. Hopefully, that will seal in the surface. Then patch all the bad areas, and spot prime those with the oil. Then you can attempt to paint the latex finish coat.
 
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Old 05-13-04, 09:20 AM
flynch
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I can't be 100% certain, but I don't think that the back of the paint that came away from the ceiling was disty or sparkly. So its probably #2.

I want to add that I just read the thread on Behr vs. Glidden, and I thought your comments there were excellent. Unfortunately I read that thread a little late, I had just finished painting a room with Behr paint, and it most certainly sucks. I'm thinking about sanding down the rough parts in that room and giving it another coat with some decent paint (benj moore) - is it ok to do this? Is there anything I should watch out for. Obviously I'll try to match the colors as closely as possible.

WRT primer, can you recommend one that I should look for, or are they all basically the same?
Are there specific ceiling primers?
I'm also using some funny ceiling paint that I got at home depot that goes on pink and dries brilliant white, and don't recall the exact make of it right now, but is this paint generally OK, or is it just a gimmic?

Thanks again.
--Frank
 
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Old 05-13-04, 09:31 AM
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I'm thinking about sanding down the rough parts in that room and giving it another coat with some decent paint (benj moore) - is it ok to do this? Is there anything I should watch out for. Obviously I'll try to match the colors as closely as possible.
You will probably have to repaint from corner to corner, as the color won't match 100%.
WRT primer, can you recommend one that I should look for, or are they all basically the same?
Dodge the ones that say 'stain killer', or 'sealer', (like KILZ for example), as you are not trying to kill stains. Look for one that says something like 'undercoater/primer', or something close to that. Most likely, it won't be found in Home Depot. Check out a local paint store. And it won't be cheap, probably around $20-$30 a gallon. But you need what you need. But make sure it is oil.
Are there specific ceiling primers?
No.
I'm also using some funny ceiling paint that I got at home depot that goes on pink and dries brilliant white, and don't recall the exact make of it right now, but is this paint generally OK, or is it just a gimmic?
If it works for you, then it works. To me its just a gimmick, because I paint ceilings in a specific pattern, so I know where I have painted and not. I turn off the lights, and open the drapes, and start at the opposite corner of the light source (window). Then I can look at the shine on the ceiling to see what is wet and what isn't.
 
  #8  
Old 05-13-04, 09:38 AM
flynch
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Originally Posted by prowallguy
You will probably have to repaint from corner to corner, as the color won't match 100%.
Yep, I figured as much, a complete second coat required, and we'll have to go around and cut out again... joy!

Originally Posted by prowallguy
If it works for you, then it works. To me its just a gimmick, because I paint ceilings in a specific pattern, so I know where I have painted and not. I turn off the lights, and open the drapes, and start at the opposite corner of the light source (window). Then I can look at the shine on the ceiling to see what is wet and what isn't.
It works OK for me, I'm doing most of this painting in the evening which is less than ideal, but I don't have much of an option right now... but thanks for the tip. I appreciate all your advice.
cheers,
--Frank
 
 

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