Is there a "shelf life" for paint?


  #1  
Old 05-21-04, 01:47 PM
Amatuer
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Is there a "shelf life" for paint?

Basically, what the title says.
 
  #2  
Old 05-21-04, 02:37 PM
prowallguy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 2,597
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Yes there is, but it depends on if the paint can has ever been opened before, or if its still 'factory sealed'. Also where it was stored, if it got hot or froze. And if was opened, was it properly closed again before storing.
 
  #3  
Old 05-21-04, 05:31 PM
Amatuer
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by prowallguy
Yes there is, but it depends on if the paint can has ever been opened before, or if its still 'factory sealed'. Also where it was stored, if it got hot or froze. And if was opened, was it properly closed again before storing.

Just say the paint can was opened and was closed properly. And the paint was stored inside the house. How long does paint last in that situation?
 
  #4  
Old 05-21-04, 10:31 PM
prowallguy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 2,597
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I'd say 3-5 years, more or less.

If it smells funky, its bad.

If it smells like paint, and brushes on OK, its OK.
 
  #5  
Old 05-22-04, 12:09 PM
N
Member
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 109
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
i've seen paint last even longer than that if it was sealed properly. if you aren't sure, just take it to your local paint store and have them shake it up.
 
  #6  
Old 09-06-04, 02:29 PM
jatco's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 1,064
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
..Curious about storing paint...

-Hi all...
Ive Been wondering about storing my left over paint that I want to keep and was going to move it from my shed (not heated) to the attic. I figured the attic would be a good idea in the winter 'coz it never get below 0*. I wasnt too sure about during the summer when it gets pretty da** hot up there.
Most of the info I found gave a shelf life of up to 15yrs for oil based and 10yrs for latex.
This is some other info I found from the www.

"What's the best way to store cans of left over household paint?

Store leftover paint upside down, in a cool place where it can't freeze, and where it won't hurt anything if a can leaks a little. Full cans keep better. Heat accelerates deterioration, so try not to store it in direct sunlight, a hot attic/garage, or next to something warm like a water heater or furnace.

The key to storage is keeping the air out of the can. Don't wipe the brush on the lip/rim of the can while painting. Paint will get in the grove (called the "chime") and make it difficult to seal the lid properly. Before closing the can, carefully wipe the 'chime' and the rim of the lid free of paint residue.

!! (Whenever possible, buy latex paint. Latex paint works as well as oil-based paint for most jobs.)


Use a permanent marker pen to write notes about the paint on the bottom of the can (e.g., paint manufacturer, B-24 R-66 (color code), bathroom trim, 12/2000 (date purchased). If you won't be able to see the bottom in it's storage location, also write the info on the side of the can, or on a label you put on the side.

How to determine if stored paint is usable

If the paint will mix when stirred, it is probably usable. Oil-based paint can be usable for up to fifteen years. Latex paint is usable if it is less than ten years old and has not been repeatedly frozen and thawed.

The best way to determine if latex paint is usable after it has been frozen is to brush the paint on newspaper. If there are lumps, the paint is not usable.

Give away what you donít use

Contact your neighbor, local schools, theatre groups, churches, or community centers to see if others can use your leftover paint.

Safely dispose of or recycle whatís left

Air-dry small quantities of latex paint (one inch of a can) for disposal. Simply remove the lid and leave the can in an outdoor place away from pets and children. Once all the paint is completely dry, place the open can and lid in your garbage.

Larger quantities of latex and oil-based paints can be brought to participating stores or a household hazardous waste collection event.

Thrifty solvent tips:
1. After you wash your brushes and rollers in paint thinner, mineral spirits, or turpentine,
let the used solvent solution sit for a few hours.

2. Once the paint particles have settled to the bottom, carefully pour the clean solvent into a clearly labeled container, and then properly store for future use.

3. Save the old, unusable solvent and paint particles for the next household hazardous waste collection event.
.

Still curious about the effects of heat on stored paint...ie-- if stored in the attic during the summer months. I only have about 5cans I want to store as I could use the room in my shed. I guess if I have to, I'll move the cans out during the summer..and back in, during the winter....

Any ideas about 'heat' and paint...(latex generally..- lower 'boiling point' that oil based...Im presuming...)
TIA....
.
Just found this....
Storing Paint Safely
To properly store paint, clean the rim of the can to ensure a proper seal. Pour 1/8" (3mm) of solvent on top of oil-based paint, or 1/8" (3mm) of water on top of latex paint to seal the surface, then secure the lid. Alternatively, stretch plastic wrap over the can opening, replace the lid securely, and store paint upside down. This will create an airtight seal to keep the paint fresh until you're ready to use it again. Always store paint away from heat sources at temperatures between 3 degrees and 35 degrees Celsius, and out of the reach of children.

.

so I guess that answers my question... Maybe I should keep a thermometer in the attic...LOL.
Jatco
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: