Painting red cedar siding


  #1  
Old 08-01-04, 04:59 PM
kambiz
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Painting red cedar siding

I am planning to paint the entire exterior of my house consisting of bare red cedar siding and decks and fences painted in an ugly red ochre/burnt sienna color. So far I have washed the siding using a product called "like new" with excellent results, and am currently in the process of pressure washing the whole thing. I am planning to do the following next:

1. Prime the siding using top of the line Sherwinn-Williams latex primer tinted alabaster white.

2. Follow up with two coats of Sherwinn-Williams Duration satin latex paint, in alabaster white again.

I have the following questions:

1. Should I cover the red cedar siding with paintable water repellant wood preservative for exterior or will the primer do the job?

2. Is it a good idea to add something to the primer and/or paint to prevent mildew?

3. Is it likely that red cedar will bleed through the primer, and if so what is the remedy?

4. What should be the time interval between pressure washing and piming, priming and first coat of paint, first and second coats of paint?

5. Should I use the same type of paint for the trim and deck fences? If not what do you recommend?

6. What should I use to cover the alreadu painted but fading and peeling deck floors?
 
  #2  
Old 08-01-04, 05:17 PM
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1. Should I cover the red cedar siding with paintable water repellant wood preservative for exterior or will the primer do the job?
No, I think the primer will do the job.
2. Is it a good idea to add something to the primer and/or paint to prevent mildew?
I wouldn't worry about the primer, but it couldn't hurt to add it to the final coat of paint.
3. Is it likely that red cedar will bleed through the primer, and if so what is the remedy?
Very possible, thats the only change in your plans I would recommend. Use an alkyd primer instead of latex.
4. What should be the time interval between pressure washing and piming, priming and first coat of paint, first and second coats of paint?
If its not too humid, and it dries like it should, 24 hours is plenty of time in between.
5. Should I use the same type of paint for the trim and deck fences? If not what do you recommend?
you said you will use satin for the body, I would use semi gloss for the trim and fence.
6. What should I use to cover the alreadu painted but fading and peeling deck floors?
I would use a porch and deck enamel.
 
  #3  
Old 08-08-04, 06:56 PM
kambiz
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Thank you prowallguy, I really appreciate your advice. But here's the problem I have with alkyd primer: once you paint bare wood with this type of coating it covers the wood with a non-porous barrier or film that does not allow the wood to breath anymore which might trap moisture and cause condensation problems among others. Are best latex primers so poor in blocking tanins and other things that can cause bleeding? Is there any acceptable latex type alternative to alkyd? Your comments would be very much appreciated.
 
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Old 08-10-04, 12:52 PM
IndustryInsider
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There really are no Latex primers on the market that I know of that can block tannin as good as an Alkyd. Adhesion wise, you're in good shape with a quality latex primer, as far as tannin bleed is concerned you've got a catch twenty-two. The positive is that the Duration (which doesn't need any additional mildew inhibitors) has excellent coverage and hiding. The negative is that a lighter colors (alabaster included) are more prone to showing discoloration from tannin, mill glaze, etc. Best bet would be to grab a quart of tinted latex primer and do a sample area to see if there's any bleed through. If it's severe, I'd switch over to a long-dry oil based primer (a slow dry 24 hr recoat one--stay away from the fast dry 2 hr recoat ones) otherwise I'd stick with the latex.

Personally I'm a big fan of satin body satin trim combo's, but it's a matter or personal preference.

On the deck floor....what kind of paint is currently on it? Is it peeling up everywhere, or only in a few areas? What I'm looking for is after doing the powerwashing/prep work, how much paint is actually left on the deck floor. If most of the paint comes up, I'd go with a good quality solid color deckstain. The higher end stains can adhere to small areas of existing paint. If you do go with paint...then I'd be sure to check the product labels. There are alot of "Floor enamel" products out there that are Not rated for exterior wood applications. You could try the duration but I'm leary about using a regular housepaint on a walked-on surface (especially a paint that pricey). The railings, supports and other structures are okay for painting, as well as the fence, it's surfaces that get foot traffic and occasional standing water/winter snow that make me a little nervous.

 
  #5  
Old 08-10-04, 08:34 PM
kambiz
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Thank you IndustryInsider for your comments. Testing a small area is a good idea which I was thinking about, but what I really need to know is how long does it take for tannin bleed through to manifest itself? In other words how long should I wait after testing to decide whether to use Alkyd or Latex?
 
  #6  
Old 08-10-04, 09:18 PM
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Tannin Bleed can happen at any time, from a few days to years later. I would use alklyd primer if you plan to use paint. Especially with the light shade. I wouldnt trust a latex primer on cedar. It can bleed through a latex primer . Ive seen it happen.
 
 

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