Neatly Painting Trim Work if House is Made of Brick?


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Old 12-11-04, 12:09 PM
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Unhappy Neatly Painting Trim Work if House is Made of Brick?

I'm planning to paint the exterior trim portions (window, door casings, etc.) of my house which is made of red brick. When the house was built, the trim work, joining the brick, was obviously pre-painted giving it a perfectly, neat, straight "factory finish" appearance. Now that the trim needs painting, I'm trying to figure out how to do it without getting white paint on the red brick. Brick has an uneven, coarse surface, so masking tape won't work. It will help but it won't prevent some of the paint from touching the brick. The trim on some other brick homes in my neighborhood has been painted and all the work looks at least slightly sloppy (got some paint on the brick). Does anyone know how this can be prevented? Or, uh, CAN it be prevented? I guess I'm just too picky. As an experiment, I carefully dabbed and pressed some modeling clay to form a protective barrier between the trim and the brick. Worked pretty well -- but not practical because it takes too much modeling clay and too much time! I also tried to use caulk, but it hardens before the paint dries; is hard to remove; and leaves a ragged residue. Any suggestions? Considering all the short-cut, helpful gimmicks available today, you'd think there would be a product made for that specific purpose. Paint products manufacturers -- are you listening?
 
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Old 12-11-04, 03:16 PM
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Considering all the short-cut, helpful gimmicks available today, you'd think there would be a product made for that specific purpose.
There is. Its called a brush and a steady hand.
Really, this is the best way to do it.
 
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Old 12-13-04, 04:08 AM
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Yep - the gimmicks are just that - gimmicks. There's no substitue for a good brush, good paint, and a steady hand. No, not all brushes are the same. There IS a difference. There is also a difference in paint quality. Going cheap to save a buck or two on either the brush or the paint will indeed impact the steadiness of the hand.
 
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Old 12-13-04, 07:47 AM
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Good Paint Brushes

Prowall and Bob -- thanks for the replies. I guess I'll give it a try and probably most importantly, resist the temptation to hurry it up. Speaking of paint brushes (I've done some minor around the house painting of this and that), it seems to me that the best brushes for painting just about everything are pure, soft-bristled, natural camel hair brushes. Nylon bristles are stiff and wiry and leave a rougher looking finish. But ... a painter once told me that soft, natural bristles have a tendency to absorb and contain moisture and are not good for painting exterior surfaces.
 
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Old 12-13-04, 01:38 PM
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Not sure what's available in your area, but poly/synthetic brushes are designed for latex, acrylic, or waterbourne paints, whereas natural/china/camel brushes are generally for oils, alkyds, varnishes, etc. Choose one that matches your paint.

Most all brushes will work interior or exterior, just depends on your application.
 
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Old 12-17-04, 09:17 PM
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Most Paint around brick is uneven, because if it is done right, it is caulked between the brick and the wood to prevent moisture from getting behind or under your wood. It also prevents any number of spiders and other insects from making a high rise condo of you casings in all the perfectly suitable holes. (take a look for spiderwebs). The uneveness comes from the uneveness of the brick and mortar. But to someone that knows what they are looking at, What counts about the paint line between the wood and the brick is the neatness of the caulking. The caulking should be applied with the caulk gun and you should never try to smooth it out. this is usually what causes it to look so sloppy. If you try to smooth the caulk out, that is when it will get out on the bricks. it takes practice to caulk a nice smooth even bead of caulk against the brick, Then you paint the casing and run your edges with the caulk, painting over the caulking because left unpainted it will turn yellow.
 
 

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