Ball & Claw Tub


  #1  
Old 01-30-00, 07:17 AM
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We hust recently bought a house with a great ball & claw Foor tub. What is the safest way to remove the extra layers of paint from the outside and resurface the inside? Also, once the paint is removed from the outside, what would be the best paint to use on the porcillan (sp?)?
 
  #2  
Old 01-30-00, 02:06 PM
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I'm moving your question over to painting. They will probably be better able to help you.

Ted
 
  #3  
Old 01-30-00, 07:53 PM
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The outside may be easier for you.
Scrape loose paint,
sand it,
treat rust using a rust converter,
prime with a rust Inhibitive primer,
paint with an oil base enamel.
Finished!

Or you can go furtherů

Found this for you at Newkote.com

CLAWED BATHTUB REFINISHING

As a refinishing company, we specialize in the old fashion clawed bathtubs. When a surface is worn out we have two options, one is to fill the worn areas with a polyester filler, or use our high build primer, and sometimes even a both combinations on the inside of a bathtub itself. When using the
primer as a HIGH BUILD primer the drying time is longer.


STEP 1
Sand Blast the outside of the bathtub (cast iron) to make it smooth. Feet are included.

STEP 2
Fill in any divits that are on the outside of the cast iron.

STEP 3 Chemically treat to kill rust on exterior of tub and feet.

STEP 4
Etch the inside of the bathtub (porcelain) to make the surface porous.

STEP 5
Fill in any chips or worn out areas in the bathtub with a polyester plastic.

STEP 6
Refinish the outside of the bathtub to your choice of colors (High Gloss or Flat).

STEP 7
Refinish the inside of the bathtub to your choice of colors (High Gloss).

STEP 8
Refinish feet. Feet can be refinished to your choice of colors, or clear-coated for more authenticity.

They sell refinished clawed bathtubs.

4'- 5'
Starting at $650.00
6'
Starting at $850

PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE HARDWARE


Also found this for you:
re: inside of the porcelan tub

There is refinishing system manufactured by Integrity Refinishing Coatings of Dallas,
Texas. You can hire a refinishing contractor in your area to do the job or you can
do-it-yourself. Here's what you need to get started;

TOOLS

High volume low pressure spray gun
Respirator (to protect against paint fumes)
Palm sander
Masking Tape paper, and sandpaper
MATERIALS
Integrity Refinishing Coatings primer, EP-acrylic top coat
Chemical cleaners (Step I and Step II)
Caulk, reducers, bonding agent for porcelain and tile

GETTING STARTED

The key to a good refinishing job is good preparation. Take the chemical cleaners and
apply to every surface you're going to refinish. The chemical cleaners serves two
functions in the 'refinishing system': 1) it cleans and de-greases cabinets, tub, tile,
appliances and countertops, and 2) it prepares the surface for a chemical bonding agent that will chemically react with the paint to form a tough, long lasting factory finish for porcelain and tile. Rinse off and dry all surfaces after cleaning.

Once you've cleaned your surfaces (cabinets and countertops), you need to sand them
down before you paint. Sanding slightly "roughs up" the surfaces and will help the
coatings bond better. Use a palm sander for this job. A palm sander vibrates instead of
rotates and this will help you to avoid creating an uneven surface as you prepare the
area. Once you've sanded all the surfaces, take some paper and masking tape to cover
any areas you don't want painted. If you're painting around a dishwasher, be sure and
mask it off from the inside out. In other words, you want to tape completely around the
seals so they are not painted.

For porcelain or tile surfaces, you will then need to apply the chemical Adhesor (bonding
agent). You apply about 2-3 oz. of this material with a cheesecloth or paper towel or you spray on with a mister. Allow 5 minutes for this dry and then you are ready to apply your primers and top coats.

PAINTING

EP-Acrylic is an acrylic polymer coating. The chemical reaction created in this two-component refinishing process produces a beautiful but tough finish that will last for years. It can be used to refinish kitchens, countertops, bathtubs and even tile. Consumers can choose whatever color they like to create the look they want and the material comes in gloss, semi-gloss, and satin finishes. Gloss is best for tubs and tile and satin for counters and cabinets.

Follow the directions for mixing the primer, pour the mixed primer in the paint pot and hook up the spray rig. It's always a good idea however to test the rig in the garage or yard on a piece of paper or scrap wood to make sure your air pressure and paint flow are correct.

Once you've tested the rig, you're ready to paint. Take the wand of the spray rig and
starting at the top of the surface you're painting, spray back and forth. When you get to the edge of the surface you're painting, release the trigger of the spray gun before you start your next pass. This will greatly reduce the risk of overspray that can cause the paint to run. For a smooth application, with each new pass, overlap about ╝ of the
previous pass.

The 'refinishing system' recommends two coats of primer and two-three coats of
EP-Acrylic top coat. It takes about 30 minutes for each application to dry and then 24 hours for the chemical bonding to finish. The result is you get a factory finish and a bright new kitchen for relatively little cost. For example, a typical custom replacement in the kitchen (cabinets, countertops, appliances) costs $15,000. Hiring a contractor, by contrast, will cost you $2500, or less than $500 (including the $35 rental for the spray rig) if you do it yourself with Integrity Refinishing Coatings refinishing system.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Integrity Refinishing Coatings

Toll Free: 800-773-7336


------------------
Larry Plummer
5824 Corydon Ridge Rd
Georgetown, IN 47122
1-812-949-3013
larryplummer@juno.com

[This message has been edited by Larry Plummer (edited January 30, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by Larry Plummer (edited January 30, 2000).]
 
  #4  
Old 11-14-01, 02:32 PM
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Question refinishing question...

How does one know when a tub needs refinishing?

Also, can a handy husband really refinish a tub himself? Will it look "homemade"?

Thanks!
 
 

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