Painting Clean Line @ Wall/Ceiling Intersection


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Old 01-21-05, 07:55 AM
DIY Warrior
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Painting Clean Line @ Wall/Ceiling Intersection

My interior painting consists of the ceiling and walls being different colors. I thought it would be easy to cut in with a brush or use a paint pad for edges (the one with the roller wheels). Both methods did not produce the desired results. I then used painters tape and taped off the ceiling and the base boards. This worked pretty well but is very time consuming. I have three bedrooms and a bathroom to paint, and the three bedrooms will require two coats each because of the colors being used. Is there an easier, less time-consuming way to get professional results?
 
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Old 01-21-05, 08:24 AM
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Cutting in with a brush is the best method. It does take a bit of practice.

Most important is using the proper tools and material. Cheap brushes and cheap paint make this task much harder than it is. Buy a quality 2" sash brush. A $12 brush really is that much better than a $2 brush.
Buy quality paint from a paint store. Again, there is a big difference over what you buy in a big box.
Buy a paint pail. Do not even think of dipping the brush into the can the paint comes in.
Dip the brush in about 1/2" then tap the brush on the side of the pail to knock off excess paint. Start the stroke away from the edge and ease to the edge.

Another key point - paint with the tips. Sounds obvious, right? Then why do so many diyers paint with the sides?
Use a long stroke. The brush will start to go dry, but that is ok.

With quality tools and quality paint and proper technique, you will only have to cut in once to where the colors meet. You will still put on a second coat, but not where the colors meet.
 
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Old 01-21-05, 09:02 AM
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Thanks for the info, Bob. I'm using Benjamin Moore so I think my paint choice is fine, however, I was using a poor quality brush, so I will fix that problem. As far as using a paint pail, what is different about using the pail instead of dipping into the can? and, I have been using a plastic jar to dip in, is that any different than using a paint pail? Finally, when using the brush, should the brush be held so that it is parallel to the ceiling and the brush is moving sideways, or should he brush be held perpendicular to the ceiling so that brush is moving forward (if that makes sense)?
 
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Old 01-21-05, 10:58 AM
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The sash brush [angled tip] is a good idea. If you want to get a 2" brush for doing the windows -ok, but for cutting in walls at ceilings I would suggest a bigger brush, as big as you can handle at least 3" though. This is just my opinion, but I don't think any painter would use a 2" brush for this purpose. If you think you can't handle the bigger brush than by all means use the 2" brush. . I like to put the paint on in 1 direction then when it starts to go dry I move down the wall horozontally and flip the brush over [to get the paint on the other side of the brush and work back to where the previous paint ended. Finish up that section by making sure there is no exess paint at the bottom of the cut in line. It tends to accumulate there. Just a few thoughts. Hope they make sense.

If I might answer the last question you asked. The tips are parallel to the ceiling. Using the angled tip brush,keep shortest tips a little further away from the ceiling than the longer tips. Makes it easier to see what you are doing.
 
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Old 01-21-05, 11:19 AM
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I use a 3" sash brush, and when cutting in the walls at the ceiling line, my brush is usually at a 45 degree angle between wall/ceiling. When you paint the ceiling, make sure to overlap the ceiling paint down at least an inch or two onto the wall. Then, when I cut in the wall, I actully overlap the wall paint up on to the ceiling just a hair. When you step back from the wall, it will provide a very nice, clean line.
 
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Old 01-21-05, 12:57 PM
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Thanks to all. I will use your advice.

Any thoughts about the paint pail suggestion vs. the paint can vs. a paint jar that is mentioned by Bob and later myself?
 
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Old 01-21-05, 01:30 PM
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Yes, I prefer a 3" brush myself, even using a 4" brush at times. I was thinking a 2" brush would be easier for a diyer. Plus, most h/o have a hard enough time buying one "exensive" brush, much less two. Though, you will soon find out that the cheap brush is really the expensive brush. You will get done sooner and do a better job with a quality brush. A good brush holds more paint but allows the paint to flow to the surface easier.

The reason for the pail is because repeated dips of the brush into the can (or small jar) will cause stray bristles. The pail also gives you more room to knock off the excess paint.

When cutting in the wall, the bristles are parallel to the ceiling. Actually, the handle will be tilted down a bit. If perpendicular, you have a greater tendancy to use the sides of the brush.
Joneq completed the instructions. I had left out the reverse pass. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-21-05, 10:44 PM
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I actually prefer using a plastic pail too as compared to the can. The main reason for this is that when you dip/slap the brush, eventually paint gets up under the rim of the can on the inside, and sooner or later, it will dry, get crumbly, and fall /get knocked back into the can, creating chunks in the paint. And oh how I hate to strain paint.
 
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Old 01-31-05, 10:25 PM
talkdecorating
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Here's what I've done...

I use a 3" or so angled brush and I bought this very small roller w/ guide at Home Depot...I wish I could remember the name...anyway, it's like a 3 inch wide roller designed for cutting in work and it has a guide/guard that tilts out for paint loading and then snaps back into place.

ANYWAY, I removed the guide completely from the roller & use it with my brush to "line" the top of the walls. It's MUCH better than the paint pads. The lip of it is angled up, so excess paint doesn't squish under it and get on the top (then on your ceiling like it will w/ a paint pad). It also swivels and "rolls" along the wall very easily (no wheels, though).

It made it easy to get a laser straight edge where the ceiling meets the wall. Time consuming, but looks PERFECT.

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Last edited by prowallguy; 02-01-05 at 03:11 AM.
  #10  
Old 02-01-05, 05:26 PM
macarthurpjc
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painting a wall

hi there, ive painted a bathroom wall with a mildew resistant paint. my problem is that at the bottom of this wall the paint disapeared all togethere as long as the base board. i did it two coats, the only problem i can see is that my soulmate instaslled a water pipe to outside which a hole was left about 1 and 1/2 inch opening around the hole, would that of been the problem;
 
  #11  
Old 02-01-05, 07:11 PM
Certaguy
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practice,not everyone makes great cut lines
i employ alot of painters - all think they are professionals yea yea
all can cut - only one can perfectly
 
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Old 02-01-05, 07:30 PM
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only one can perfectly
Certaguy, I don't recall working for you
 
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Old 02-04-05, 06:10 PM
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prowall's advice is expert & professional as always. Use a high quality slanted trim brush (I prefer 2" brush) and high quality paint. And, you need a steady hand. Edge as you go so roller can roll into fresh paint and there will be no lines. If applying dark colored paint to walls have primer custom tinted. It will save you lots of labor and paint when it comes to rolling on coats of paint. Two coats is the standard.
 
 

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