Painting with Cedar / Heat Gun Benefits


  #1  
Old 09-27-00, 09:14 PM
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I have a brick house with a lot of wood trim. Some of the trim, around my garage door for example, have a rough surface (cedar). It's time to repaint, but how do I prep the surface if the wood is supposed to be rough.

Also, are heat guns recommended to remove paint from the exterior wood trim - prior to priming and painting?

thanks for the help!
 
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Old 09-29-00, 07:32 PM
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Bert, I'm not sure I understand your question <How do I prep the surface if the wood is supposed to be rough?> As long as it is clean, dry and not peeling you are ready to paint. On the heat gun, they will soften almost any paint inside or out.....Mike
 
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Old 09-29-00, 08:39 PM
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Bert:

You SHOULD consider buying a heat gun, but if you first use it outdoors you may be disappointed in it, especially if it's a windy day. Heat guns work best indoors where the air is calm. Also get one of Sandvik's tungsten carbide blade paint scrapers to use with it. The Sandvik paint scraper is a lot more expensive, but because the head is all metal, it stands up to the heat. The other paint scraper heads gradually melt away on you. Also, with the Sandvik, the blade is FLAT, which is more than I can say about the regular paint scraper blades after you sharpen them a few times. Finally, the Sandvik blade sticks out past the side of the tool, so it's great for getting into corners.

DO NOT buy an expensive heat gun. Heat comes in different quantities, but not different qualities. I learned that the hard way. I have a $39 Black & Decker heat gun and a $200 Bosch heat gun. They both work equally well, but the Bosch has a longer cord.

The only accessory worth paying for in a heat gun is the concentrating nozzle. The nozzles that are supposed to flare the air out don't work right. All the heat still goes out the middle, but the accessory gets hotter because of the hot air hitting the sides of it, and that's not what it's supposed to do. The advantage of a concentrating nozzle is that it gives you much more control over where the heat is and where it isn't, and that's important for doing around glass windows and where painted wood meets varnished wood or where paint you want to remove comes close to paint you don't.

Also, it is not necessary to remove all the paint from the wood. You should remove anything loose, but if the old paint is putting up a fight with you because it wants to stay on the wood, it's not necessary to remove it only to replace it with new paint that's not going to stick any better. Just paint over the old paint.

Get a cheap heat gun. It will come in useful removing old paint, removing old adhesives, softening old vinyl flooring, reactivating old contact cement, etc. A heat gun is a very useful tool.
 
 

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