Bridging colors between rooms

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  #1  
Old 10-02-00, 03:35 PM
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I have a circular floor plan. You can see each room from the other. How do I choose a palette of colors to decorate these rooms? I want the varied colors to blend room to room (living room to dining room to kitchen to family room to entry and back to living room). I am uncertain of how to select based off the paint chip flyers at the paint stores. Do all the colors on those flyers mix and match together? Thanks!
 
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Old 10-04-00, 06:07 PM
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Loopy, I have been thinking for days how to help you. In most cases the paint samples that have 5 or 6 colors light to dark do go well together but are the same color in different shades. As many rooms as you have to do I would think no more than 3 basic colors in a couple of shades. Which leads to finding these colors. I saw a solid color stain chart at Sherwin-Willaims today that had 25 or so 3 color combos that all were matched very well. I know you won't be staining but the colors can be crossed to paint. This a way to get a "second opinion" as to whether colors really go well together or just look good to us. Most paint stores have these combo groups on the larger full page take home sheets and you may have to ask for them.......Good Luck...Mike
 
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Old 10-04-00, 11:54 PM
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I have though about your problem also. Mainly because it's intriguing. I don't disagree with Mike, but another approach is to use either split complements or triadic colors with the same chroma. (Chroma is he degree of saturation of a hue [color] from neutral grey). Selecting colors with the same chroma is easy with a color fan. Selecting split complements or triadic colors is easy with a color wheel.

Using hues with the same chroma mutes the harshness between colors. All of the hues have the same value of grey or intensity. Using split complements or triadic harmony allows greater color selection without inharmonious colors.

To proceed obtain a color wheel from an craft or art supply store. Pick up the color fan at a paint supply store. (It may be necessary to leave a hefty deposit, because color fans are jealously guarded). When the fan is opened all of the color samples have the same chroma across any chip sample. For example, all of the chips along the top have the same chroma regardless of the color. Use the color fan pick the main colors and the intensity of that you enjoy. Then use the color wheel to pick split complements or triadic colors.

I understand that this sounds daunting, but it's really much easier than it sounds (with a fan and color wheel, of course). Foreshortened versions of a color wheel with a sample of complementary, split complements, and triadic harmony follow. Spin the indicator for harmonic colors. Using split complement or triadic harmony it's relatively easy to select more than three colors with the same chroma.

If selecting colors is stressful, follow Mikes suggestion.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">code:</font><HR><pre>


complementary

red
red purple ^ yellow red
(orange)
|
purple | yellow

purple blue | green yellow
|
blue | green
blue green


Split complements


red
red purple ^ yellow red
(orange)
/ \
purple / \ yellow

purple blue / \ green yellow
/ ___________ \
blue green
blue green


Triadic

red
red purple ^ yellow red
(orange)
/ \
purple / \ yellow

purple blue /___________\ green yellow

blue green
blue green
[/code]

 
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