painting fiberglass doors


  #1  
Old 10-24-00, 08:46 PM
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I wanted to touch-up our fiberglass front door on the interior where the stain has smudged over the last ten years but the gel stain just makes it look worse. Should I use paint? If so, what kind is there available to let the wood grain effect show through after I paint over the stain? Any other ideas?
Thanks,
Larry Gulick
larryg5050@aol.com
 
  #2  
Old 10-25-00, 11:39 PM
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Larry Gulick:

Unfortunately, one of the mandates of "paint" is to hide the underlying colour, and if you paint over whatever wood grain is still showing, you're going to hide that too.

I would buy a clear urethane varnish and apply that as protection... at least around the door knob where the smudging you are reporting from normal usage over the past 10 years has occured. That will preserve what you have now as accurately as possible for future generations.

If you want to hide the smudging to some extent, then paint. I would recommend that you use Benjamin Moore's base # 303-90, which is a urethane fortified oil based "enamel". (In PaintCo. speak, "enamel" means "this stuff dries harder than our regular oil based paint", and that's about all it means. However, the introduction of urethane makes this oil based paint dry as hard, as clear, and as poor to hide an underlying colour, as you would expect from the mixture of an oil based off-white paint and varnish.

I know from personal experience that Benjamin Moore's Base # 303-90 is absolutely pathetic at hiding an underlying colour. However, it's probably the tougest, most scuff resistant paint I've had the pleasure of using. If this sounds like what you are looking for, then look no further than Benjamin Moore's #303-90 "Melamine" base, which can be tinted any off white colour in the rainbow. Fat lot of good that would do, though, unless you use like 8 coats to hide the underlying colour.



 
  #3  
Old 10-25-00, 11:54 PM
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Larry Gulick:

Your greatest protection with the lowest hide would come from a clear urethane varnish over what you have. Urethane is the toughest paintable finish you're likely to come across, which is why it's used on bowling alleys. As soon as you mix it in with oil based paint, you compromise the protection the urethane provides with the hide and colour change the paint provides. (With most of these speciality paints, like BM Melamine, the qualities of the paint you end up with is pretty well proportional to the percentages of the components you mixed to make the paint. Mixing urethane varnish and oil based paint to make Melamine results in a highly scuff resistant, low hide paint. I think that's what you want to, isn't it?
 
  #4  
Old 10-27-00, 07:42 PM
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There's a simple way of handling this situation. First step, ignore the last two nuggets of "help". Second, clean the area that is smudged with TSP, let dry, take the same material used on the door and do it again feathering into original coat, clear coat with a satin poly, wax entire door with tinted Briwax or Mylands wax.
 
 

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