Stairs and Trim


  #1  
Old 11-09-00, 12:38 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cool

My husband and I purchased a house about 2 years ago. We did not get the stain package for the stairs and trim around the house. I would like to make the stairs and trim look like wood. The paint on the stairs is probably a cheap, white semi-gloss. Is there a easy way to stain or paint to mimmick wood?
 
  #2  
Old 11-10-00, 02:30 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

I would suggest for premium results to strip the paint to bare wood (being sure to test a spot and see if it is what you want) and restaining and sealing.

There are companies that make Graining Tools for what you are describing, but for the details you would need for stairs (spindles, handrails, etc) I would think it would be extremely difficult to do properly. They use a base coat and stain to get the effect and are sold at most hardware and paint stores.

Be aware before stripping that the trim in the house may be paint grade, meaning that it will not look good stained and the graining tool may be worth a try.
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-00, 03:01 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cool

Thanks for the reply Chipfo!
I think the stairs and trim are a paint grade quality. I guess with all the new technology with faux finishes, that there would be a paint that looks like stain.
What a concept!
If I painted the stair railing should I use a gloss type with some sort of sealant?
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-00, 03:23 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

To re-paint, useing a quality paint from a pro paint store, you will not need to top with a sealant. Be aware that most painters use oil based paint for woodwork and you will need to do the same for a simple re-coat. To tell whether it is oil based paint on it now or not, you can purchase a very small can of goof-off from a paint store, it is formulated to remove latex splatters, test with a rag and goof-off in a hidden area, if it removes the paint(or leaves paint residue on rag) then it is latex, if it does not, then it is oil.

If it is oil, you can topcoat with oil or reprime with an oil primer and use a quality latex. If it is a latex then you can use either oil or latex. Never latex directly on oil paint.

Be sure to clean off any dirt or grease, lightly sand with a 220 grit and clean off dust before and between applications for best results. Also use quality brushes, forget about the cheap throw aways.
 
  #5  
Old 11-13-00, 08:55 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Talking

Thanks again!!!! Chipfo!!!!
I am on my way to test it out!
 
  #6  
Old 11-13-00, 11:08 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

You are welcome! Post back if you have any more questions or problems. Remember we are giveing advise site un-seen, good judgement on your part will help you to do a quality job
 
  #7  
Old 11-13-00, 10:35 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Chipfo,
On a quest to solve an unrelated problem (restoration of old porcelain) I ran across the following speciality paints. (For my use I'm leaning toward delacrafts Air-Dry PermEnamel Tile and Glass Paint, because it's the only air cured enamel that is dishwasher safe). (Other similar products recommend heating setting in a conventional oven). (Avoiding any type of re-firing was the reason for the quest).

Anyway, saw the post, and just thought I'd drop a line. Maybe someone else can benefit.
2000
P.S. (Welcome new moderator! Keep up the good work).

Specialty paints:

----
Product: One Stroke Wood Grain Paint
Product claim: no stripping, priming, or graining tool necessary. (Similar in idea to multi-color paints).

Product: Tough As Tile - Tub & Tile Finish
Product claim: easy to apply, self leveling epoxy finish, with a paint brush or foam roller.
White - can be tinted using a universal tint system.
http://www.rhodesamerican.com/consum...pec-coats.html

----
Selected Arts & Craft paints - each company has other types also.
----

Porcelaine 150 - surfaces: porcelain, earthenware, ceramic.
Vitrea 160 - surfaces: glass, crystal.
Ceramic - surfaces: earthenware, ceramic, metal.
Arti'stick - surfaces: can be applied and repositioned as many times as wished on most smooth and non-porous surfaces. (Interesting concept).
http://www.pebeo.com/index_us.html

----

Glass and Tile Opaque and Semi-Opaque Paints
Glass and Tile Transparent Paints http://www.lefranc-bourgeois.com/
(French company)

----

Deka Translucent Waterbased Glass Paints
DECART, Inc., 419 Harrel Street,P.O. Box 309,
Morrisville, VT 05661 USA,
FAX: (802) 888-4123
Toll Free: (800) 532-7895
www.dekapaint.com (site not fully enabled)

---

Air-Dry PermEnamel Tile and Glass Paint
http://www.deltacrafts.com
 
  #8  
Old 11-14-00, 06:58 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Thanks 2000, I will check them out and add them to my list for future refference.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: