Painting stained window trim and baseboard.


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Old 03-15-05, 03:37 PM
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Painting stained window trim and baseboard.

Hello all,

My wife and I are getting ready to do some home remodeling. We are going to paint most of the house including the baseboards and the door and window trims. Current all the trim is stained a medium dark I believe it is pine. The house was originally built in 1988 by the builder and then sold after it was completed. I am not sure if the trim has a coat of poly on it or not, but I suspect what ever is customary was done since it was done by the builder. We also have Anderson windows which are vinyl on the outside and the same stained wood on the inside.

Okay, now the question. We plan to paint all of this trim. What do we need to do for prep? Should we clean it with any thing special, beside soap and water? Should I sand it all with medium sand paper? Should we prime it first, do we have to?

Thanks for any help and suggestions.
 
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Old 03-15-05, 05:56 PM
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Scuff sand all the trim, and wipe down with a tack cloth. Definitely prime it, as stained woodwork almost always requires 3 coats to cover. 1 prime, 2 finish coats. Either use an oil primer, or a bonding primer, like Zinsser's 1-2-3.
 
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Old 03-15-05, 08:13 PM
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Okay, I already have Zinssers 123 which I used in a high moisture area so I will use that and use a latex paint. The paint is a white trim so the primer should match fairly well.

By scuff sand do you mean with a medium grit paper, or a fine paper like 220? And I am guessing a very quick sand of all the surface is adequate?

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-16-05, 02:31 AM
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Medium sandpaper is far too rough.220 is more like it.You only need to lightly "scratch" the surface to promote bonding.
 
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Old 03-16-05, 02:43 PM
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Also I would use a deglosser to wipe down the woodwork with.
Remember the whole key to having a profesional lasting job of this type is the preperation. With out good sanding ,deglossing and primer what ever is put on for a finish coat will eventually chip and peel. Done right it will last as long as any paint job.
 
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Old 03-16-05, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Also I would use a deglosser to wipe down the woodwork with.
Remember the whole key to having a profesional lasting job of this type is the preperation. With out good sanding ,deglossing and primer what ever is put on for a finish coat will eventually chip and peel. Done right it will last as long as any paint job.
What do you recommend as a deglosser? TSP?
 
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Old 03-17-05, 04:23 AM
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What do you recommend as a deglosser?
Peso is what we use, available in most paint stores.
 
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Old 03-17-05, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Rook
What do you recommend as a deglosser? TSP?
liquid sandpaper is my first choice, but most any solvent based deglosser will work most will have deglosser somewhere on the label
 
 

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