Using a brush, foam roller, or spray??


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Old 03-20-05, 08:09 PM
DarleneS
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Using a brush, foam roller, or spray??

I am doing my Kitchen cabinets and have practiced on the bathroom ones before had--I found it difficult to eliminate drips and other painting streaks with a brush--the foam roller seemed to work best by the edges were still hard. Is it worth it to try and rent a sprayer and spray them in the garage? What challenges do I face with that??
This job is getting bigger than me!!

Thanks
Darlene
 
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Old 03-21-05, 04:22 AM
M
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If you have never used a sprayer you might have more problems than before although with a little practice and skill spraying makes for a nice finish. When using a small roller on a cabinet brush all the areas that the roller won't get first then roll the rest and you should get a decent job. Also if you take the doors off and remove the hardware you can get a better and easier job.
Hope this helps.
 
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Old 03-21-05, 05:36 AM
T
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After you have removed the handles ,paint the edges with a brush and allow to dry and then repeat in sequence..ie: primer,undercoat,topcoat.
Then remove any fat edges on front surface by running a blade all around the door.
Then using a 12" good quality foam or mohair roller apply an even coat of primer in all directions..Then immedietly run a 2" almost dry brush through the paint from top to bottom.(this is called "laying off".) Repeat the procedure with each coat rubbing down with extra fine paper between coats..Best paper to use is the "wet and dry" variety that is used for car bodywork.
If however you like the orange peel effect that the sponge roller creates then skip the wet & dry paper step.(Just "lay off" with the dry`ish roller from top to bottom.

I would advise that you remove all the doors,drawer fronts,handles etc and create a production line in a dust free area to speed up the job.
 
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Old 03-21-05, 07:31 AM
J
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you didn't mention what kind of cabinets you have --face frame or euro or what kind of doors you have flat , real wood raised panel[ which shouldn't be painted] routed out panels ?????. Painting the inside too, shelves come out.

With regard to the drips try a small paint pad for the edges, sometimes called a sash pad and don't load up the paint on it. Unless you plan on painting the inside of the drawers remove the handles and paint them in place don't remove them watch out for the screw holes they will collect paint and drip. As for the doors set up a table with 4 dixie cups per door. Do the back first completely then the front. Use floetrol if you are using latex it will allow you more time to go back if a drip occurs. Do 2 coats on the door then for the final coat do the edges only and wipe the paint off the front let that dry. Then do the front and wipe the paint off the sides =no drips[do this only if you are still getting drips]


Disregard everything if you are painting real raised panel doors
 
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Old 03-21-05, 08:18 AM
DarleneS
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Originally Posted by joneq
you didn't mention what kind of cabinets you have --face frame or euro or what kind of doors you have flat , real wood raised panel[ which shouldn't be painted] routed out panels ?????. Painting the inside too, shelves come out.


Disregard everything if you are painting real raised panel doors
No, No by raised panel it would be implied that they would be somewhat stylish and easy to look at...I have flat panel, not completely there is a raised border but the inside is flat. I don't like oak (too much grain)and I definetly don't like the honey color of the 1980's even though it reminds me of the 70's and the house was built in 97...I just cannot look at them any longer! Thanks for your time
 
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Old 03-21-05, 08:34 AM
J
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sounds like you are ready to paint as long as the whole center panel doesn't float and the door is 1 piece. You shouldn't need anything more than a 4" foam roller + 1.5 " foam roller +small paint pad + and maybe a small regular brush just in case. A 4" paint pad is also nice as it will smooth things out after applying paint with roller and has built in guides to keep paint off of walls. this can be used with out the roller. I usually follow the roller with the pad ,but that is just me.

Did you prep the cabinets yet??
 
 

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