Painting on stained Oak Wood


  #1  
Old 03-28-05, 11:49 AM
Gana
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Painting on stained Oak Wood

Hello,

Probably this topic has been discussed already but I am new!

Very basic question:

I would like to paint (example: white color) on finished stained oak trims in my home. How would I do that so that the grains does not display. The trims also have some design in them, in other words, its not plain. So, I guess sanding would be tough.

But my main concern is, I really dont know how it will look like with grains/patterns on a white paint, so I would like to have a nice flat smooth finish. Is it possible at all in oak??

Thanks a lot!

Gana.
 
  #2  
Old 03-28-05, 12:23 PM
J
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It is probably not worth the effort,for me anyway, to try and get rid of the grain on a moulding that is not at least mostly flat. Have you considered a less glossy paint that will not reflect the light so much and hide the grain a little. If the designs are straight and like flutes this is not too bad. There are sanding aids made that are wrapped in sandpaper that can sand these straight lines pretty easy. Why not try a little on some moulding and see if you like it. At least you will know what it will look like and if you don't like it come back with the particulars. If you decide to paint you might want to ask how to go about it here. You can't just slap some paint on.
 
  #3  
Old 03-28-05, 12:46 PM
M
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Ok let me try again. my first answer disappeared as I was about to post. First let me say I hate to see beautiful oak painted over but it is your house and you should be able to have it how you want it. Prep is very important! You need to sand well, then wipe down with a deglosser and prime with a good oilbase primer [such as kilz]. To help hide the grain I would use a latex finish coat. It will take 1 coat primer and at least 2 coats finish. Be sure to sand between coats and caulk the joints after sanding the primer. With a little effort it should come out fine.
 
  #4  
Old 03-28-05, 05:14 PM
B
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I agree with Mark on all points. You are taking something that is virtually maintenance free and making it something that will need attention everytime you paint that room. But it is your house.

You will need to sand and prime before topcoating.
 
  #5  
Old 03-29-05, 11:53 AM
Gana
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Thank you all!

It was helpful. I am trying to do this only in one room - the baby room. The wall colors and accents are all pleasing yellow, green and pink. You know how it looks. To accentuate the colors, the trim has to be white. This is my theory.

Thanks again.

Gana.
 
  #6  
Old 03-29-05, 12:12 PM
J
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You are right. I would First clean the moulding with a product called easysand 123 I think. It is in the depot in a white and red plastic container in with the paint strippers. It is not a paint stripper. It is a water based cleaner that slightly etches the paint. After that prime with some Zinnser bullseye 123 primer sealer. Topcoat whith a good quality latex topcoat. Ben Moore or Shwerwin Williams seems to be the popular choices here.

I like the Zinnser products but maybe in your case it would be better to go with an enamel undercoat which will leave a nice finish to paint on. I don't think it will make a difference though. Make sure you use the cleaner etcher above if you go with a regular enamel undercoar. Maybe sand a little too.
 
  #7  
Old 03-30-05, 10:46 AM
Gana
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Thanks. One more question!

I am getting a little confused. Sorry.

Let me see if I have got this correct.

1. Clean the trims using easysand 123 or any water based cleaner.
2. Apply Primer like Zinnser bullseye 123.
3. Apply latex topcoat.

or)

1. Clean the trims using easysand 123 or any water based cleaner.
2. Apply enamel undercoat.
3. Apply latex topcoat.

Correct? Where does the sanding come in the steps?

Thanks again. Thinking of painting the trims I have come to another road block. How do I paint the baseboards that a so much in touch with the carpet? Do I have to remove the baseboards, paint it and install it or is there a simple way to mask the carpet?

Gana.
 
  #8  
Old 03-30-05, 11:31 AM
J
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easysand 123 is not just a cleaner it puts microfine scratches in the surface as you clean. You don't even need to use it ,but it can't hurt. The zinnser bullseye 123 sticks to anything including shiny surfaces and clear finishes that are probably on your wood. Forget about the enamel undercoat it was an after thought and compliates things.


clean the surface with the easy sand or other cleaner I prefer "soilax pro" from the professional paint store but it is hard to find in some areas. I like it because you do not have to rinse it as with other cleaners and it does a fantastic job on trim and all around the house. You do not need to sand anything unless you have runs or drips on the moulding now

Apply the bullseye 123 and let it dry for at least an hour. Do not fool with it and don't worry if it doesn't look like a perfect pain job as long as it is on it is good enough. Just put on a normal coat. you can put it on with a small 4" roller and brush it out with a good brush which will came in handy when you put on the topcoat.

Now apply the topcoat with the cleaned roller and cleaned brush and let it dry for like 4 hrs or so or over night. If you wait till over night and you are using a glossy finish you may need to lightly sand So it may be easier to do all the painting in the same day. By painting I do not mean the bullseye 123 just the 2 finish coats. Try to do them in the same day. Some people do the first topcaot in flat paint then the second in a more glossy sheen to save any sanding. You do not have to sand flat paint before recoating. Put blue or better yet purple tape on the walls if you don't want to paint them too, unless you think you can paint the edges of the trim without getting paint on the wall I would use the tape. You will need to "burnish" or rub down The tape a little to make sure you don't get any paint under it. Remove it carefully when done by pulling the tape off the sides of the door trim and pulling DOWN toward the floor not out into the middle of the room. Remove all the tape in a similar fashion.
 
  #9  
Old 03-30-05, 12:35 PM
M
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If you sand in between coats you are more apt to get a slicker finish
 
  #10  
Old 04-04-05, 01:24 PM
Gana
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Thanks

Thanks! I will probably come back with more questions once I get to the job :-)

Gana.
 
  #11  
Old 04-04-05, 01:25 PM
Gana
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baseboards?

While we are at it any idea how to paint the baseboards? It is in so much contact with the carpet. Is removing it, painting it, nailing it again - the only way to do it?

Thanks
Gana.
 
  #12  
Old 04-04-05, 01:34 PM
J
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don't remove the carpet if it is wall to wall. I usually just stick a 12' flexable spackle knife between the rug and the moulding and bend it back toward themiddle of the room. Wipe it off everytime you do it. I wear a special shirt that is covered in all kinds of paint. I just wipe it on the shirt. You may want to sand the moulding a little if it has rug fiber on it. They also sell plastic things in the depot called carpet protectors that work pretty good and stay down for the whole job start to finish. Get enough so you can cover the whole room or just buy 1 pack and keep moving it
 

Last edited by joneq; 04-04-05 at 01:56 PM.
 

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