Splotchy Paint on New Drywall

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  #1  
Old 04-29-05, 02:09 PM
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Splotchy Paint on New Drywall

I need some expert advice. I had a new drywall ceiling installed. I primed it with Sherwin Williams primer -- 2 gallons. Then I painted it with 2 gallons of Sherwin Williams Classic. It looked splotchy to me -- almost like it had dark shadows in the paint. So I painted it again with another 2 gallons of Sherwin Williams Classic. It is STILL splotchy. I am very frustrated and not sure what to do. I used the roller cover that Sherwin Williams recommended.

How many coats does new drywall normally take to get a nice finish? I thought the primer was supposed to keep it from soaking up paint?
I have spent a ton of money on all this paint and now it looks like I will have to buy still more --- but will it solve the problem? Could it be the weather? It is cold here in Missouri right now and I read somewhere that cold temps and low humidity can cause the paint to dry to fast and cause this. Could that be it? Would it help to thin my paint for the next coat?

Thank you if you can help me. I really can't afford to keep going back to SW for more paint everyday. I need to figure out how to solve the problem.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 12:31 AM
Trey
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It sounds like you have done everything right. A coat of primer and two coats of Classic 99 is a great job. It's a sheetrock cieling, so I am assuming it is inside and tempature controlled. If the sheetrock was less than 50 degrees when you painted, yes there will be a great problem. The only thing I can think of if the tempature was controlled, is that whoever painted didn't keep a wet edge. Paint dries a little different at different times so the wet edge is critical. Also was the sheetrock sanded and dust free before priming? Its hard to give an opinion without seeing it, but those are the two things that jump out in my mind. As far as solving the problem, more paint is needed, it won't hurt to talk to the manager at SW, he or she might give you a better price.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 02:29 AM
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I agree with trey it is probably an application problem. It is important not to leave lap marks on the ceiling. Thinning the paint down should help. When applying 2 coats on a ceiling I like to apply the first coat the long direction and the final coat the short direction. If the room is not square go from the 2 walls that are nearest so that you can avoid or limit lap marks. If you turn the heat down [to slow the drying] this should help too.
2 coats are ussually sufficent for most ceilings. Any flaws can be seen more often on ceilings than walls because there is nothing to break up the line of site. Wish you the best of luck with your next coat.

p.s. The manager and some of the sales people at SWP have the ability to give you a better price. Since you have been in there so many times for this little project ask them to give you the contractors price.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 02:31 AM
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Trey, thank you for the reply. I did the painting myself ... and it is very possible that my technique is lacking. I read just about everything on this board before starting this project because I wanted to get it right. I think I may have been trying TOO hard. I went with SW paint specifically because it seemed to be so highly recommended on this board.

Yes, the room is temp controlled. That is, the heat is turned on, but I suppose that could mean it dried the paint too quickly. Yes, the new ceiling was sanded and prepped by the professionals who installed it.

How do I keep a wet edge? Maybe I am working too slowly?
Do I have to repaint the ENTIRE ceiling again (I assume I do) or just the areas that have the "shadows" or splotches? Do you know if SW normally will help me out by perhaps replacing the last 2 gallons of paint that didn't get the job done? Afterall I have spent a lot of money in their store the last few days. I am doubting that they will, and I do understand that they can't guarantee "one-coat coverage" but I just thought their paint would be more "cooperative" (easier to work with than this.) I guess I will just have to see if our particular SW store is that congenial with their customers.

Thanks so much for your attempt to help me.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 07:47 AM
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What sheen did you use - flat, satin, semi-gloss?

What color?

Are the "shadows" worse at different times of the day (different light levels and angles?

What is above this ceiling? Is it another floor or the attic?
A coat of primer and two top coats is usually enough, regardless of the sheen.
 
  #6  
Old 05-01-05, 02:50 AM
Trey
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heartshome,
Don't feel bad I can tell you some real horror stories of homes I went to where the owners painted themselves and turned a job that might cost $600 into a $2000 one. You are not in that shape. Yes you have spent alot of your time and money on this project and I understand your fustration. You are most likely working too slow. To be safe yes you will have to paint the cieling again. Go to the SW store you purchased the paint from, you have to talk to the manager, no he or she will not "give" you the paint (well I doubt it), but if you are really nice and tell them the whole story they might cut you a big discount, but this will be entirely up to the manager, and we all know you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Once you get ready to paint make sure you have no distractions don't answer a phone half way between your job, cover everything you need to before hand and reroll your cieling make sure you are overlapping and working with a wet roller, a dry roller will make you move slower and will leave a bad appereance. From what I understand you have rolled it three times already and that means you have been getting alot of practice so I believe you can do this. BTW what size nap roller are you working with? I use a 3/8 or 1/2 on smooth cielings. Anyway good luck and if the manager is not likely to work with you any, though I doubt that, the SW managers I work with always seem sympathatic to thier DIY customers you can email me your address I have a stack of 15% off cards for SW and I wouldn't mind mailing you one.
 
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Old 05-01-05, 05:46 AM
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Hi Trey, BobF, Marksr & all ....
You are all so great. Thank you! Here's the latest update on my painting fiasco. After reading your post Trey, suggesting I talk to the SW manager, I called the store and talked to the salesman who has been selling me all this paint. (By the way, I have also bought wall and trim paint from him which I have not started on yet.) He said he could not understand what was causing the problem and even offered to come out to my house and take a look if I could wait till next Wednesday. I didn't want to wait so I went in to get MORE paint. He asked me, "would you like me to give you one gallon and you pay for one or would you like me to give you both?" I said, "Both." So he did. Very nice man. But because I have been applying Classic 99 "Bright White," he suggested this time I use the "Extra White." I was worried about changing shades and I do think it may have been a mistake, but I followed his suggestion as I have throughout.

I then added the 4th coat (including the primer) to my ceiling. I was SO VERY careful and tried to do everything exactly right - I worked hard to keep a wet edge. Guess what --- when it dried completely, there are dark streaks over almost the whole ceiling! This is now 8 gallons of paint I have put on this ceiling. My husband says if I keep painting, it is going to be so heavy it will collapse.

I am totally discombobulated with this whole thing. I have painted before, and as hubby said yesterday, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to paint a ceiling, so I just can't figure out what is causing this problem. I talked to a friend yesterday who does alot of painting and she said, "Your first mistake was buying SW paint -- I hate it and my husband used to work for the company!" She suggested I go buy Benjamine Moore and try it one more time. She thinks the whole problem is I got bad paint. I have to say that even the store clerk said it could be a "bad batch." (I have to wonder if part of the problem on this last coat is because the SW manager sold me a different shade of white. I questioned this at the time and he said it would not make any difference.)

To answer some of your questions; as I mentioned, the color is white. This is a 2 story house and I am painting the first floor so yes, there are rooms above this ceiling. The lighting in the room is almost like being outdoors because on the southern-facing side, the whole wall is side-by-side 7 feet high windows ... this means bright light in the room. No way to hide any flaws. I used the SW roller cover (3/8 nap Golden Eagle) they recommended and on the last coat, switched to the 1/2" nap. This is a new smooth ceiling -- no texture. The paint finish is "Matte." The "shadows" are always there, however they show more when the sun is shining than at other times... However if you stand at one end of the room and look at the ceiling at the correct angle, you can see them ANY time. I did turn the heat down while painting and I don't believe it came on at all while I was painting. I did alternate painting direction with each coat (I thought that would help too).

Soooo, now I have deduced (after MUCH thought!) that it must be either poor technique or bad paint. I walked through some of the other rooms that I painted about a year ago and decided they look fine and if I could paint then, why can't I paint now ... so I can only conclude that I need to change paint brands. This in itself confuses me because I know that so many of you recommend SW and I trust your judgement.

I just don't know what else to try. But I have decided I will NOT give up. I have so much invested in this ceiling now, that I am going to stay with it till I get it right - short of having to buy my own paint store! As much as I hate having to spend more money and buy the expensive BM paint - I feel it is the only thing left to try. I am tempted to try a thin cheap paint and see how it works at this point! I have considered putting a layer of Kilz primer on the whole thing and then a new layer of paint ... I don't know what to do at this point, but I am really tired of painting this same ceiling over and over.

Forgive the long post.
Grateful for any help,
Heartshome
 
  #8  
Old 05-01-05, 09:15 AM
Trey
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WOW I am stumped. I've used Classic 99 plenty and never had a problem, its not my favorite paint in the world but I have no complaints, and as far as cielings go that is a more than adequete of a choice. I am very happy the manager worked with you. I would take his advice and have him come out on Wenesday. I can not give a diagnosis over the net even pictures would not help. Ben Moore is great paint and you will pay alot of money for their name. Try going to paintquality.com, they have an online troubleshooter, maybe you can find it. I've been in the buisness for over 15 years and I find a new problems quite often, so there are plenty of things I, other contractors, and pain store managers don't know, and it is especially hard without seeing it up close and personal. Keep us informed and GOOD LUCK!
 
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Old 05-01-05, 02:27 PM
kdnovak
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We used 2 coats of primer on our new drywall. The first coat of primer soaked into the drywall and the 2nd did not. Then we painted the color and it looks great. Although I would think after so many coats of paint, it should count as at least 2 coats of primer.
 
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Old 05-01-05, 02:28 PM
kdnovak
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p.s. We used Benjamin Moore and it's been fabulous! It goes on so nicely and caused us no issues whatsoever.
 
  #11  
Old 05-01-05, 02:39 PM
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I hate to hear you are still having problems. Although I have always preferred the promar 200 and some of the promotinal lines you should have gotten a good job out of the classic 99. Definetly have the paint rep come out and look at it. You have put entirely too much effort into this job. SWP and Benjamin Moore both have quality paints [both have cheap too] but SWP is usually a little easier to afford.

look forward to hearing you have found a 1 coat solution!
 
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Old 05-01-05, 03:16 PM
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Do have the rep come out and look at it. Then post back with the response.
 
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Old 05-02-05, 04:42 AM
pushylady
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spraying

HOw about spraying the ceiling instead of rolling? Does anyone think that would help at this point?
 
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Old 05-02-05, 06:22 AM
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i think it's just about got to be shadows! how does it look at night with interior lights & lamps on???
 
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Old 05-02-05, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by pushylady
HOw about spraying the ceiling instead of rolling? Does anyone think that would help at this point?
Hate to spray in an occupied house - too much to cover up. At any rate even with cheap paint the ceiling should look good with that many coats.
 
  #16  
Old 05-09-05, 09:40 PM
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for starters dont use that matte finish on the ceilings get a flat finish.trust me they are not the same, the flat finish is alot more forgiving.if SW says they are the same pack up dont look back and go get some Ben Moore flat.having said that i think the problem you are having is called "flashing" its when you see in the painted surface dull to shiny areas without a uniform consistency to the sheen of the paint,and the higher the gloss or sheen of a paint is the more difficult it is to remedy this problem, thats why most ceilings are painted flat.the reason for this is the paint is not drying together at the same time from your pass with the roller to the next pass with the roller.to help with this lets look at thinning the paint(you can use this with all your future projects as well).buy a product called Floetrol,what it does is slows the dry time and helps the paint flow out or smooth out more.add a pint of this to gallon and also a half a pint of water.to be honest i do not apply paint without at least thinning it with some water.thinning the paint alone will probly do the trick but lets look at how its applied.for starters"ARE YOU PAINTING THE CEILING OFF A LADDER WITH ROLLER FRAME IN YOUR HAND??? no...no...no... get an extension paint pole so your feet are on the ground and you can see what your doing and you can roll out a greater distance.always cut a wall and or ceiling then roll it before doing the next.dont push on the roller.i did say dont push on the roller!! if you need to push on the roller to get more paint out of it stop and dip it in the tray again.pushing on the roller will cause the roller to get smaller meaning it will hold less paint making you push on it more to get more paint out of it making it smaller holding less paint making you push more......you get the idea.let the roller do the work -your just telling it where to go.you want wet paint being put on not almost dry paint from you pushing every last little bit out of the roller.thats where the "flashing" will come from you pushing the roller and not putting it on thick and wet.for ceilings ....cut it in,roll the short width not the long.do 2 or 3 roller widths from wall to middle of ceiling then do same to other side,continue this pattern down the ceiling keeping a wet edge.for walls...cut it in,roll from ceiling to floor with each roller dip,continue down the wall.hope this helps!
 
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