2 Qs: fixing tape-peeled paint, and painting over hi-gloss


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Old 05-20-05, 09:32 AM
S
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2 Qs: fixing tape-peeled paint, and painting over hi-gloss

Hi there. We're painting our kitchen ourselves, after having had a professional remodeling job. Two questions:

I did two coats of Zinsser Bulls-Eye 1-2-3 primer/sealer on the whole room, as the walls and ceiling were mostly bare drywall. Then the next day I got my husband to help with the actual painting. He started to put painter's tape on the ceiling where it meets a wall before I could say "are you sure that's not going to peel off the paint?" and of course it did. So now we have about a foot-long strip of peelage up there on the ceiling. Looks like your shoulders about a week getting a sunburn so bad it blistered. What's the best way to clean/patch it up so that I can re-prime and then paint? I don't want to do anything that will cause it to peel out more. Do I just sand it down? What grit?

Also, I've decided I don't like one of the paint colors I used in there. It's a Glidden acrylic high-gloss, and the paint chip from the store looked like a very pale peach but on the wall it looks like a very pale yellow. So I want to go back over it. I've found a Ralph Lauren color that's more along the lines of what I want. The question is, since the yellowy Glidden is hi-gloss, do I have to prime it all again, or can I go straight over it? Does it make a difference if the Ralph Lauren I plan to put over it is hi-gloss or semi-gloss? The only reason the Glidden was hi-gloss is the store was out of the semi-gloss base and I decided it didn't matter, but I'd just as soon go back to semi-gloss if I have to paint it all over again anyway.

Thanks a lot for any help---you guys were a big help about a year ago when we were prepping our old house for sale!
 
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Old 05-20-05, 10:43 AM
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First part of your question... are the edges to where the paint peel rolled up and loose at all??? If not, you could just touch it back up with primer. If they are, you basically are going to have to wait ~1-2 weeks for that paint to cure, then sand it back down and then touch it up. Just make sure it's a sound surface before touch it up. On to your second question, you are correct, it's not good to put a lower sheen paint over a higher sheen paint. But you don't necessarily have to prime. You could just use a liquid sandpaper type product... USA makes one and so does goof off. I would be careful how i applied it though, i would do it very lightly. If that paint hasn't cured yet, it could gum up very quickly and you would have a mess on your hands. good luck, post if you have any other questions.
 
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Old 05-20-05, 11:03 AM
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Hey noleguy, thanks for your thoughts. There are some loose edges hanging off the ceiling where the paint is peeled. We originally painted it last weekend... would going at it again this weekend be too soon?

Regarding painting over my Glidden hi-gloss, can I infer from your reply that if I decided to just get the Ralph Lauren in hi-gloss as well, I could just paint right over it without priming or liquid sandpaper or anything?

I don't want to rush through getting it done to the point it looks bad, but on the other hand, my house has been a wreck of plaster crumbs and drywall dust for two months now, since our kitchen renovation started, and I'm desperate to have it done. If hi-gloss instead of semi means it happens faster, I'm in favor of that!
 
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Old 05-20-05, 02:45 PM
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Unhappy

sand where the paint came off on the sealing and patch it with some drywall compound. If you can't sand it use a razor blade to cut it out. then patch. Don't cut the paper tape in the corner[wall -ceiling] just the paint.sand smooth prime and paint.

If you go any of the glidden wall paint on the ceiling cover it with ceiling paint -maybe sand it a little first. Get some more 123 and tint it close to the color you have chosen for the kitchen, put it on. Paint the walls=done.

Liquid sand paper is for fully cured paint and may not be ok for you. Don't chance it. Your paint is not fully cured by any means. It is mostly for trim since you have to paint while the wall is still tacky for best results. Major headache----literally!!

Are you really painting your walls gloss??????. Never seen one that looked good,in any room Tough on the eyes too. You should be able to paint the ceiling line without tape. Did you even try? Get a good brush and give it a try. Joneq knows you can do it, just like he knows you will tire of the glossy walls
 
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Old 05-20-05, 04:47 PM
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My 2:
So now we have about a foot-long strip of peelage up there on the ceiling.
I would bet my last dollar that this occured due to dust on the surface before priming. If it was 2 coats, and done last week, and it still peels right off, its definitely an adhesion failure. And since it was bare drywall, it all adds up to that.
What's the best way to clean/patch it up so that I can re-prime and then paint?
I would use a small putty knife, and scrape outward at all the edges of the peeled area. Scrape all off that comes up easy until you can't scrape anymore off. If its loose, you want it off now, and before you have a couple finish coats of paint on it. Use a fine grit sanding sponge, and hit the edges. If they gum up, its not dry enough yet. If it sands clean, then its ready. Make sure to clean off all the dust before repriming. After sanding, if you can't feel the edge, then its ready to reprime. If you can feel it, then it must be lightly spackled or skimmed over with some joint compound. Feather out the edge, sand it, dust if off good, and reprime.
do I have to prime it all again, or can I go straight over it?
No need to prime, just let it thoroughly dry, and scuff sand it with 120 grit, or a sanding screen on a pole. This wil give it "tooth" for the next coat to grip onto. Once again, remove the dust with a damp rag or tack cloth. Assume 2 coats when changing the sheen level.
 
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Old 05-20-05, 05:37 PM
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Just curios. Did just the paint peel off the primer on the ceiling or did the Bullseye 123 peel too. The stuff usually sticks to anything.
 
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Old 05-20-05, 06:20 PM
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As PWG said, if you didn't broom it while you blow it (leaf blower or vacuum exhaust) or vacuum it, the sheet rock dust is usually excessive and will cause poor adhesion. Next, the ceiling peeled not the freshly painted wall from your description meaning the 123 on the ceiling peeled. This could be from poor adhesion (the dust issue) or the 123 wasn't cured yet. Taping is usually done over paint that is fully cured (30 days+), it is always iffy on fresh paint. Next the recoating question- when paint is still fresh, no sanding or deglossing is required and you can put more over the first coat with any sheen you want as long as you stay in the same base (i.e. water or oil). You might try using a razor blade to stop the peeling from continueing further (slice a line 1" into the good part and peel it to the cut mark) then use zinnzer peel stop to glue the edge down. On small tears I use crazy glue to seal the edge. Then if the edge isn't too thick just paint over it with the 123.
 
 

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