power washing?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-02-05, 09:41 AM
trance's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: usa
Posts: 406
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
power washing?

Hey guys. I'm getting ready to repaint the exterior of my 135 year old wood sided house. Many people recommend power washing before starting, however, my local Historic District Commission won't let us power wash - saying that the pressure will damage the wood. They will only let us scrape, sand and wash with the garden hose.

According to the Historic District Commission, I'll have to scrape and repaint again in a couple of years then "everything should be fine".

I don't really want to do that much work!

What's your opinion?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-02-05, 11:01 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
High pressure power washing alone is not ok. I think they are referring to removing paint with high pressure water. Using a power washer to apply the chemicals[water,bleach-jomax] +soap] and washing them off with low pressure[300 to 500 psi] or a hose will not harm your wood or anybody elses for that matter. Using a pressure washer to remove lose and peeling paint is really not the way to go on any house. Tell the historic society that major damage can be inflicted on wood with a paint scraper, much more than a low pressure housewashing.

I would do as they reccomend prep the house by hand and do it right and you will not have to be doing it every few years

After you are done prepping it either you or a powerwashing co can come in and clean the house with low pressure,really no pressure, and a paint prep solution.

The non cleaning prep,scraping, sanding and priming, should be done by hand and the washing should be done with chemicals under low pressure.
 
  #3  
Old 06-02-05, 11:39 AM
trance's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: usa
Posts: 406
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ah - that makes sense.

So, I could do the hand prep, then clean with a low pressure powerwasher OR use a hose.

I think they are OK with that, I think they are worried about using high pressure power wash to remove paint.

Thanks!
 
  #4  
Old 06-02-05, 01:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: United States
Posts: 2,535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry, but I'm with the commission on this one. I'm sure Joneq knows what low pressure is, but I doubt most h/o would have the same definition. Most h/o would end up using too much pressure, perhaps even the wrong tip. You don't need to remove all the paint, just what has failed. And if they allow you do power wash, they can't stop the next guy.

BTW - why would you treat a grand old lady like that anyway? You wouldn't take a power washer to a Dusenburg or Model-T, at least I hope not.
Don't look on it as a chore. Look at it as giving the old girl some respect.
 
  #5  
Old 06-02-05, 01:20 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,427
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
Misuse of pressure washers can cause damage to the siding. A zero tip on a commercial pressure washer will go through 1/2" plywood in a few minutes. A good scraping and sanding should be adequate to prepare the siding for paint. The main purpose for washing a house should be to clean any mildew, dirt,etc off for a good clean surface for the paint to adhere to. Good prep and use of good paint should make the paint job last for many years. If the interior has not been extensively remodeled and does not have great insulation and vapor barrier on exterior walls I would recomend using latex primer ands finish as it will allow the walls to breath.
 
  #6  
Old 06-02-05, 01:40 PM
trance's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: usa
Posts: 406
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No worries guys - I wasn't planning on going against the H.D.C. anyway. I wanted to learn why people keep talking about power washing when the local requirement is to not power wash. I was planning on cleaning the house with the hose, but only using hand tools to scrape.

The main reason for needing to know is if I hire someone, I want to make sure they'll do it right & then I'll need to know how to do it right!
 
  #7  
Old 06-02-05, 03:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"I would do as they reccomend prep the house by hand and do it right and you will not have to be doing it every few years"

What did Bobf miss, and what does this mean.

"Sorry, but I'm with the commission on this one"

I thought I was too. See above

However, I think the HDC should enter the 21st century and permit pressure washing [not pressure paint removal]. When I pressure wash a house my tip never comes anywhere near the surface and I never leave the ground,and the house is clean.

Should the HDC decide to enter the 21st century they can set the standards on pressure and tip size so as to limit any damage to zero. To not allow pressure washing to clean a house is simply foolish. Stripping paint with a pressure washer is another subject altogether. I do not now nor have I ever reccomended removing paint from a house with a pressure washer
 
  #8  
Old 06-03-05, 12:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: United States
Posts: 2,535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Simple, the commission should keep its ban on power washing. One can do a good job washing a house with a hose and washing attachments. One doesn't need a pump increasing the pressure to get the house clean. Been there, done that.

Do you really think everyone will abide by the pressure and tip regulations?
 
  #9  
Old 06-03-05, 05:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y10...etinaction.jpg

This method puts the chemical on a 2 story house from the ground. It is not much different than a heavy rain. No ladder-no slipping off the ladder-no poles-no brushes-no brushing-no bees while on the ladder-no blown off shingles[roof or sidewall]-no injury. The chemicals need to be applied with a pressure washer because using hose accessories dilutes the chemicals so much they become ineffective. The pressure washer also allows the use of hot water which is many times more effective at removing "stuff " that interferes with paint adhesion. Not to mention the fact that when paint peels[because of poor adhesion] and it is scraped and not sanded properly it is plain ugly

Using a bucket and a brush on a pole is another option that usually requires that you get under the brush at some point[the brush is usually at the wrong angle]. It also loses much of the cleaning solution on the way up to the house. That is if you can even reach the top. Then you need to physically wash the house, the soffits and the gutters.. All the time the "cleaning solution" in the bucket is getting filthier and filthier. This all assumes you are physically able to wash the house this way with getting a heart attack. You can rent an electric start PW and it will take care of the hard part--starting the machine.

I feel confident that if you ask the historical society "what is pressure washing" their answer would not be what the picture shows. I think some of these societies are stuck in a time warp and need to modernize their thinking without changing the end result, which should be preservation.
 
  #10  
Old 06-03-05, 06:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Beaver Dam WI
Posts: 244
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Am I the only one who uses a pressure washer to help remove Paint? I find it makes scraping easier a day or two later. I think there are plenty of situations where pressure spraying to Help remove paint is feasable. I always hand scrape afterwards
 
  #11  
Old 06-03-05, 09:11 PM
prowallguy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 2,597
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Am I the only one who uses a pressure washer to help remove Paint?
Not at all, its a very common practice. In fact, my main use for powerwashing is to remove as much loose paint as possible. If there is no failing paint, then a hose would be sufficient.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: