What is the process to paint a teak bench?


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Old 06-09-05, 06:32 AM
Kearns
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What is the process to paint a teak bench?

I have puchased a new teak bench and I want to paint it green.
I know that the bench will weather and last for a long time just
the way it is but I really want to paint it. Do you have suggestions for getting the finish off? or preparing it for priming? Suggestions for primers to use and even the type of paint? Thank you for any assistance.
 
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Old 06-09-05, 09:19 AM
J
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If there is a hard finish on it I would just clean it, maybe sand it, if you need the exercise[no sanding required]and use some of this or this Then paint with a good latex or oil based paint of your choice[ben moore or sherwin williams] I imagine there will be some recomentations forthwith. Listen to them and decide what sounds good
 
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Old 06-09-05, 09:32 AM
C
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If the bench is currently finished, you could clean the surface with mineral spirits to remove any grease, grime, and wax. Then scuff the surface with a green scotchbrite pad to knock down the sheen, then prime and paint. I like Zinsser 123 for a primer. Paint with two coats of top quality exterior latex paint. Semi-gloss or gloss to help repel dirt. Sherwin-Williams and Benjamin Moore make some good exterior paints.

If you strip the current finish, you will need to wipe the teak wood with acetone to remove the surface oils just before you apply the primer so the primer can bond before the natural oil in the wood surfaces again. Without this step, the primer won't fully bond to the wood.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 06-09-05, 02:18 PM
Kearns
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Thank you for your help Chris!
I knew there was alot to it but now I am on my way!
 
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Old 06-09-05, 05:55 PM
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I hope you love this teak bench. You will spend a lot of time on it stripping and repainting every year or two. Teak has a high natural oil content. Even the best primers will fail and fail much sooner than you expect.
Part of what makes teak so valuable for boats and outdoor furniture makes it less than a good candidate for painting.

If you really, really want a green bench, return the teak bench and get one that can be painted.
 
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Old 06-09-05, 08:13 PM
J
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"Do you have suggestions for getting the finish off?"

Just leave the finish on and paint it not the teak. It doesn't really matter what is under the finish. What is the advantage to stripping off the finish as long as it it a hard finish, which it should be, since people will be sitting on it.

I am very curious as to what are the advantages of stripping it off vs a Zinsser primer.
 
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Old 06-10-05, 12:17 PM
B
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I'd be suprised if the finish is a hard finish. More than likely, its a stain or a clear oil finish. Something that will complement the natural beauty of teak.
 
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Old 06-10-05, 12:44 PM
yorkie
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having had teak for many years I agree with moderator, painting teak is like painting the Golden Gate Bridge. The only time it will have an aceptable appearance is in the first month. After that it will look blotchy. Take the bench back and get one that won't blead. Teak is best left to weather.
 
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Old 06-12-05, 11:39 PM
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another vote for "do not paint!"

gosh, you must have paid a pretty penny for this baby, eh? teak is not cheap!

there is one possible option I haven't seen mentioned and it's a long shot - what about one of the opaque stains in a green color? not the same as painting, but might be a lot more compatible with the teak.

just a thought

-art-
 
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Old 06-13-05, 12:52 PM
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I don't think an opague stain will work either. Unlike semi-transparent stains, solid color stains still sit mostly on the surface. They don't really penetrate that far. But, yes, it would be a better option than paint.
 
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Old 06-13-05, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by BobF
I don't think an opague stain will work either. Unlike semi-transparent stains, solid color stains still sit mostly on the surface. They don't really penetrate that far. But, yes, it would be a better option than paint.
actually, I think I meant to suggest the semi-transparent, but it was late and probably a bad idea anyway given the color of the teak.

do you suppose these folks could maybe find a green tung oil?

-art-
 
 

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