Primer going on unevenly + is it okay to use 2 coats of primer?


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Old 08-10-05, 10:05 AM
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Primer going on unevenly + is it okay to use 2 coats of primer?

I've got some plaster walls I've prepped for painting that are very smooth from sanding. I started putting on a coat of Kilz2 Primer last night and noticed it's not going on very evenly. There are gaps where the paint doesn't always go on. At first I thought it was because the walls were maybe uneven and the .25 inch nap on the roller was too small to fill in the areas where it's uneven. Now however I think maybe it's because I'm not getting the roller completely evenly coated with paint before applying.

Could that be it? And does it matter if it doesn't go on evenly and I have to put up a second coat of primer? You can also tell on my walls where the brush strokes from the roller are, despite my best attempts not to have any when applying. Will this matter when I go to paint? Hopefully I can cover them up when I apply my second coat of primer.

Thanks for any help!
 
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Old 08-10-05, 10:10 AM
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A second coat of primer is usually not necessary, but in your case, it might be best. The biggest concern is to ensure the mud compound is completely covered with primer. If not, you will always see the patch through your finish coat of paint.
 
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Old 08-10-05, 10:56 AM
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another coat with a bigger nap [min 1/2"] will do the trick. You will have the same prob with the finish paint and 1/4 nap roller. Do not be stingy with the primer or paint. you want a nice wet coat of paint. Most pro painter use a 3/4 nop roller to apply wall and ceiling paint. It goes on much faster. Add a little Floetrol to minimize orange peel. Pay attention to what you are doing and watch out for ropes[vertical lines created by excess paint the accumulates at the ends of the roller cover.
 
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Old 08-10-05, 12:37 PM
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Thanks for the great replies. I bought the .25 inch nap because it said it was for smooth surfaces. I had no idea I could use something as big as a .5 or even 3/4 inch nap. Also, I do think my other problem is I'm being too stingy with the paint. I'm putting it on, and then rolling most of it off. Ie, I could hold the paint roller up and no paint would drip off before I start painting. Maybe I need to put much more paint on the roller.

I do have a problem with "ropes" as you mentioned. I figured I could cover them up with the second coat. I think I've heard that however the coat of primer looks, your fnished coat of paint will look, so I definitely want it to look good. Thanks!

Edit: What exactly does Floetrol do? It says it extends the "wet edge" of my paint. Will it basically just make it easier to work with? It doesn't actually change the appearance of my paint does it?
 
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Old 08-10-05, 01:17 PM
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Keeping a wet edge is one part of it. In a hot climate paint edges will dry very fast and when you go over it it causes probbies. It also keeps all the paint wet longer giving it a chance to self level a little more than without it. This results in a smoother finish + it adds to the quantity of paint you have to apply, so if the room will take close to a gallon per coat you will have extra for touch ups if you add a cup or so of Floetrol. It does not change the color or the sheen of any latex paint. It is not for use with gloss paint. You may want to strain it before tou mix it and be sure to shake it up good. It is all good as far as joneq is concerned. I wouldn't put it in the primer though.
 

Last edited by joneq; 08-10-05 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 08-10-05, 06:09 PM
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As joneq suggested using a 1/2" nap will help tremendously. About the only thing a 1/4" nap is good for is rolling enamel on doors. Put plenty of paint on the roller, let the roller do the majority of the work, don't try and squeeze the last drop of paint out of the roller. By putting on plenty of material you will keep a wet edge and a light touch with the roller will help eliminate any roller marks.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 04:51 AM
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I got the primer on pretty evenly by adding a second coat. Basically, my primer job should look pretty much like a regular paint job right? Ie, it should be completely even? I found while working with it I often had to put a lot of pressure on the roller in order to get more paint out of the brush. Should I be using very light pressure?

I will try going with a 1/2 inch nap for the actual paint job to see if that's any better. This will probably mean however that I will have to buy more than 1 gallon of paint. I just hope the paint doesn't come out different colors since they were mixed at different times. Thanks.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 05:34 AM
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Mix all the paint together in 1 bucket before you paint.They will probably be slightly different.

Get a 3/4 nap roller cover and get it plenty wet through and through then use the back of the tray ro remove the excess[not too much].Make sure you don't hit the ceiling with the roller. 3/4 or 1/2 even is different than the 1/4 you have been using. Watch out for paint buildup at the top of the wall near the ceiling. This will more than likely happen so keep an eye out for it.

Sometimes it is a good idea to remove the roller frame,or use a 4" roller, and roll sideways at the top of the wall,but be careful not to get paint on the ceiling. Try not to miss any spots.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 05:44 AM
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You should never need to put a lot of pressure on a brush or roller. It is easier on the equipment and you to let the roller do the work and you'll be rewarded with a better looking job. A gal of paint typically covers 400sq feet. If you buy a second gal, mix the two together in a 5 gal bucket. Or at least start a new wall with the second gal.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 07:11 AM
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I was just thinking. You should probably just paint the whole room with 1 gallon without mixing it in with the second one and if you need to go into the second gallon you can then mix whats left of the first gallon in with the new gallon and not have to get another bucket. I may not bother buying the second gallon if it is that close [must be a small room with a lot of windows and doors].

Remember that adding floetrol adds to the amount of paint you have. No matter what nap roller you use it should not take any more paint. There may be more left in the roller when you are done, but this should not really make a difference. You can press a little harder to get the paint out and finish off lightly.

This assumes that you were not thinking of only doing 1 coat.
 
 

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