Textured Ceiling Removal


  #1  
Old 08-16-05, 01:13 AM
jenjen842
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Textured Ceiling Removal

We are moving into a home with a highly textured ceiling. The house was built in 1977. What are the chances it is an asbestos-containing material? Assuming it is not, how difficult is it to remove? And how would I go about removing it? Thanks for the input!
 
  #2  
Old 08-16-05, 06:12 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,738
Received 862 Upvotes on 754 Posts
Asbestos was on its way out in the late 70's. I would say that gives a 50-50 chance of asbestos. Popcorn texture is easiest to remove by wetting surface and scraping. When all texture is removed you will need to skim coat the ceiling.
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-05, 10:49 PM
Paint G
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Beware

Wetting and scraping the ceiling may release an asbestos dust if it is asbestos. Also disposal of the asbestos textured ceiling material will require toxic waste permits and special disposal provisions. I would consult a professional and find out what you are dealing with. The fines for illegal disposal of toxic waste is generally pretty high and possible health hazards for you and your family aren't worth it.
 
  #4  
Old 08-21-05, 06:27 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,127
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Originally Posted by jenjen842
We are moving into a home with a highly textured ceiling. ...how difficult is it to remove? And how would I go about removing it?
I'd try scraping it dry first
But you will probably need to wet it and scrape
It is messy and awkward being a ceiling and all, but not technically difficult
You will probably need to skim coat it with joint compound before painting
 
  #5  
Old 08-29-05, 08:05 AM
RHoyle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
? skim coat

skim coat it with joint compound before painting

I am inexperienced at this and not sure what "skim coat" means. Would you please explain that a little further.
I would LOVE to do my ceilings, they have the "popcorn" texture and I hate it. What kind of paint do most people use, after the "skim coat"
Thanks in advance for any information!
 
  #6  
Old 08-29-05, 10:04 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,127
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
A skim coat is a light coating of joint compound, or "drywall mud" (sometimes called spackle, but it's technically not spackle)
After the texture is removed, it's highly unlikely that the surface will be smooth
A "skim coat" of joint compound will fill in the dimples, so to speak

You apply the mud with a wide blade like the drywallers do, and smooth it out
The smoother you get it the less sanding you need to do, and you want to sand as little as possible (very, very, dusty)

Usually the area must be primed and then it is often painted with ceiling paint
The last time I did this the customer wanted the wall color on the ceiling, so I did that
 
  #7  
Old 08-29-05, 12:13 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,738
Received 862 Upvotes on 754 Posts
Mixing a small amount of water in the joint compound will make it work easier and hopefully make it go on smoother so there will be less sanding.
 
  #8  
Old 08-29-05, 12:40 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 85
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Why do you need to prime before painting? I use ceiling paint on my ceilings and it looked fine without primer. Since this is a surface that won't ever be touched, I wouldn't think you'd need primer if you're just throwing on a coat of ceiling paint.
 
  #9  
Old 08-29-05, 02:21 PM
prowallguy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 2,510
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Spooksmcgee
Why do you need to prime before painting?
For this thread, the idea of priming is for the ceiling surface after the texture is removed. There is usually a thin layer of joint/compound left behind, and that definitely needs to be primed, or it will soak in the paint at different absorption rates, making the final outcome splotchy at best. It is also a hindrance to adhesion to paint over j/c.
Same goes for if the ceiling will be skim coated.

If its just a ceiling with existing paint, and no stain or adhesion problems, I would skip the primer, and paint it.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: