Removing paint with heating iron


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Old 08-25-05, 10:19 AM
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Removing paint with heating iron

When I was a kid my father used a heating iron to remove the thick build up of paint on the exterior of our house. Basically it had a rectangular shaped shroud about 3" x 5" with a heating element inside and a handle. It ran on electricity. Do they still make these? If so where can I get one on the internet of possibly a chain store? I'm not looking for one of these heat guns. I have one. They work alright but I think the heating iron would work better. I have searched on Goggle but haven't been able to find what I'm looking for. I did find an infrared one but it costs $489 A bit pricey. Thanks....Tim
 
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Old 08-25-05, 10:46 AM
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I know what you are describing, but haven't seen one in years. I will do some hunting around.
 
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Old 08-25-05, 05:04 PM
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Thanks prowallguy. I searched quite a while on the internet but didn't find anything. I also looked at all the local hardware stores but didn't find anything. I asked a friend that is a clerk at the best hardware store around and he said he didn't know if they even make them anymore
 
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Old 08-25-05, 05:41 PM
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A paperhanging buddy of mine in Boston uses one for setting seams, and if I'm not mistaken, it was originally used by carpet layers. I emailed him about it, but have yet to hear back. In the meantime, check out these I found on Google.
 
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Old 08-25-05, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by TimH
...it had a rectangular shaped shroud about 3" x 5" with a heating element inside and a handle. It ran on electricity.
Hmmm...my first thought was I have one of these
But it's for carpets
Mines pretty old and I didn't buy it, I don't think ...or possibly I did at a flea market in Vermont years ago
I never thought of removing paint with it
I wonder if we are talking about the same thing
I'll see if I still have it

(PWG, I was unable to get your link to load)
 
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Old 08-25-05, 07:54 PM
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Thanks prowallguy & slickshift. The link seems to be broken I also tried typing in the address and got nowhere
 
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Old 08-25-05, 11:46 PM
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I've had good results lifting varnish and paint with a propane torch. I think what happens is that, once the heat penetrates beyond the finish, air in the wood expands rapidly and blows out the impermeable shell. That's why heat won't bubble paint around a scratch or nail hole.

Steam occupies 1000 times the volume of water, and suddenly. So I tried wetting varnished wood with sopping towels overnight, and wow the insinuated moisture must have been boiling for the varnish dropped away in ribbons, steam pouring off the clean hot wood all the while. Torching is a lot safer with damp wood, too.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 07:32 AM
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Although a torch and scraper can do wonders in removing paint you have to be very carefull. It is possible to ignite the wood. Often it won't be readily apparent and the wood will smolder on the inside until it is ready to burst into flames. That is why it is illegal in many locals.
I also remember the heating irons for removing paint,although I haven't seen one in over 20yrs.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 10:00 AM
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I've always been a little leary of using a torch also.
Like everyone else I haven't seen a heating iron in a very long time. I'm guessing they don't make them anymore
I gues I'll have to keep using the heat gun but I sure don't think it works as good as a heating iron
 
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Old 09-05-05, 07:32 PM
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Would you consider renting a power washer to remove the old paint? I have used one on several fences and it stripped them in seconds but I have never tried it on a house.
 
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Old 09-05-05, 08:29 PM
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One must be careful, power washing a house. Most houses rely on water following gravity, maybe being driven by wind, but never running uphill. A perfectly effective wall of siding can be (I would argue should be) wide open from below. Power washing forces water through any gap it hits. Too bad a lot of the people using these tools just stand on the ground and blast water at the siding above. Though the dripping result looks good and they get paid before sunset, water lingers inside the wall, rots it, and ultimately costs the homeowner.
 
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Old 09-06-05, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by mjd2k
Would you consider renting a power washer to remove the old paint? I have used one on several fences and it stripped them in seconds but I have never tried it on a house.
A pressure washer should never be used for stripping paint. It can be a good tool in removing paint soften by a chemical stripper. Although latex stains can often be removed by water pressure it is never good for the wood.
 
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Old 09-06-05, 01:33 PM
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Well I've been chugging along using a heat gun I getting there. My cousin ( he is a finish carpenter ) told me he hasn't seen a heating iron in years. He thinks they may have stoped making them due to fires. So I guess I'll watch ebay & buy one if it comes up for auction so I'll have it next time I need one. Thanks for the replies.....Tim
 
 

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