Exterior Gloss paint used on the interior


  #1  
Old 08-27-05, 07:26 AM
RHoyle
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Post Advice needed on painting interior walls, please

We recently bought a 9 yr old home. We are planning to paint the entire house. The paint on all the walls throughout the house is a high gloss and exterior at that!!!! I don't know what someone was thinking. I read in another article that exterior paint indoors can be toxic and harmful. The house has an odd smell to it; could it be from this paint?
Also, on all of the walls you can see where lint or some kind of trash was on the roller or brush. I am so concerned about painting them; I want them to look pretty and smooth.
Any suggestions on what steps I need to take to get a nice smooth finish on my walls? If I need to sand them do I also need a primer? Is there any way to strip the paint off the walls without damaging the drywall or is that even necessary?
Thanks for any help you may have it will be greatly appreciated.


Rhoyle
 

Last edited by RHoyle; 08-27-05 at 08:00 AM. Reason: concerned about the other title, i may get more views and replies after editing
  #2  
Old 08-27-05, 12:54 PM
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I would tackle this job like this:

First, determine whether the existing paint is latex or oil.
Completely sand the walls with 80 or 120 grit paper or screen. You don't need to sand the paint off, just try to scuff all of the surface.
Do all repairs such as spackling holes, etc.
Remove dust with tack cloth, swifter, or something comparable.
Prime with a top quality interior latex/acrylic primer.
Sand again, very lightly. This is best with a medium or fine sanding screen.
Remove dust.
Caulk anything that needs it, and let set up/dry (usually overnight if beads are over 1/8").
Paint with topcoat, two coats best for sheen level and durability.
 
  #3  
Old 08-28-05, 11:35 AM
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Although exterior paints may release vapors that are not intended to being confined indoors, once dry and the house aired out there is no danger.
 
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Old 08-28-05, 11:42 AM
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mark, I was told?/read?/taught? that exterior paints were bad for interior due to the fact they were designed and formulated to 'chalk off'.
I could very well be mistaken too.
 
  #5  
Old 08-28-05, 12:11 PM
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PWG
It has always been my understanding that the biggest drawback of using exterior paint inside was the fact that it doesn't dry to as hard a surface. I know the old flat oil exterior paint was designed to chaulk and [supposedly] be self cleaning but they don't make that anymore. I thought chaulk in todays ext paints was just a by product of worn out paint. I suppose it would take a chemist to be definetive on this
 
  #6  
Old 08-29-05, 06:48 AM
RHoyle
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does paint normally peel

Thank you for helpful information!
We started the prep work for the walls in the kitchen. We had started sanding and while taking a short break I moved to the border. In my attempt to peel the border, the paint started peeling. I got the hair dryer out to heat it up a little, it is just peeling off, when it is warm it feels and looks like a balloon it reminds me of chaulk! I was concerned about the paint looking thick, when I painted over it, so since it is coming off so easy my husband and I have peeled it. I kinda liked the idea of starting with a "fresh" wall. It is peeling off all the way to the sheet rock. The only drawback is that in some places it peels that paper layer off the sheet rock, not down to the rock, just till you see the cardboard looking layer. Do you think this will show thru? Once we sand the wall and get the primer on it should be fine, shouldn't it? Is this unusual for the paint to peel off like that?
Thanks again for your time and help!
 
  #7  
Old 08-29-05, 12:09 PM
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Paint is not suppose to just peel off the wall. Sounds like the wall was dusty or had some type of contaminent on it that didn't allow the paint to adhere. It is good that you found out early and removed the paint. The top coat would eventually fail if the paint it adheres to fails. Make sure the walls are clean before you prime. You may need to do some skim coating if there are any areas that didn't peel evenly.
Sheetrock is composed of 2 layers of paper [front and back] with ground gypsum rock in the middle. If you have peeled the paper off it will defenitly need to be skim coated.
 
  #8  
Old 09-08-05, 12:26 PM
RHoyle
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Question Need some advice, please

Hello again!
The walls did not peel even at all. I think it is the base layer of paint, maybe a layer of primer that it peeled in some places and in some it didn't. My husband and I thought we could sand it........that is a joke!! We have a mess, our whole house was white with dust We did not sand but a small section.
Anyway, my question is:
Do I need to put a coat of primer on my wall before I skim coat? I am going to have a lot of skim coating to do.
Also, is there a brand or type that would be better for us to use to skim coat?

You guys are great! Thanks for your help.
 
  #9  
Old 09-08-05, 03:02 PM
Boxarocks
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It is not necessary to prime before skimcoating as long as the shiny paint is gone.

You will find that you have a ton of work ahead of you & that the dust from sanding the skimcoat will be extensive.
Unless you have drywall finishing experience, your results may be less than what you hope for.

No offence intended, but I have yet to see DIY drywall work that looks professional.

Would a knock-down wall finish be suitable in your home?
This process would be faster & while it requires some skill, is DIY friendly.

I feel your pain re the surprise of the bad paint job, but it may be the time to cut your losses & seek the advice of a professional, if you are determined to have smooth walls.
 
  #10  
Old 09-08-05, 04:06 PM
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Have you thought about sanding with a wet sponge. IMO it doesn't do as good a job as dry sanding but it will eliminate most of the dust. You can buy a stiff sponge with a handle that is very easy to use. Basically the wet sponge softens the joint compound and then you smear it around to get a smooth finish.
 
 

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