How to make acrylic paint stick to caulk?


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Old 08-28-05, 03:40 PM
Hymz2u
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How to make acrylic paint stick to existing caulk?

What can you do to make acrylic paint stick to existing silicone based caulk?
 

Last edited by Hymz2u; 08-28-05 at 05:08 PM.
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Old 08-28-05, 04:07 PM
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Use paintable caulk.
 
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Old 08-28-05, 05:29 PM
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Prime it with a fast drying oil or shellac based primer, may take a couple coats. As suggested above it is best to use paintable caulk if you want it painted.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Hymz2u
What can you do to make acrylic paint stick to existing silicone based caulk?
I'm actually encountering this problem right now. Sanding doesn't work, and the caulk is supposed to be paintable to begin with.

Using a brush and heavy coats will work. You need to watch this, though, and make sure that when the paint gets a little thicker and tackier, you even it out a bit. It will take a few times of this to get even coverage over the caulk.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 06:02 AM
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Originally Posted by flintsilver7
Sanding doesn't work, and the caulk is supposed to be paintable to begin with.
.
Caulking is not a sandable surface. The purpose of caulk is to be a flexable sealant to bridge a gap. Caulk is best painted when left to cure for the recomended time on the label.
 
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Old 09-19-05, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Caulking is not a sandable surface. The purpose of caulk is to be a flexable sealant to bridge a gap. Caulk is best painted when left to cure for the recomended time on the label.
Hence me pointing out that sanding won't work. Some caulk is sandable, though typical silicone sealants are not. I think marine caulk is sandable. I would imagine it depends on the makeup of the caulk.

Paintable caulk gets more or less paintable depending on where it is (as in, how easy paint will drip off). A lot of factors come in to play, such as the type of caulk, the age of the caulk, the condition of the caulk, and most importantly the type and thickness of the paint. I've used acrylic paints anywhere from thin to molasses, and the molasses-type doesn't adhere well.
 
 

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