Ultra smooth finish?


  #1  
Old 09-02-05, 03:20 AM
drdealer
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Ultra smooth finish?

Hi,

I've always preferred a smooth surface to an orange peel, or any other 'rough' feel.

Especially for windows and doors. My question is, and this is after painting some doors (with BM Aquaglo), how do you get the ultra smooth finish? I mean, when you touch it, it almost feels as though you're touching glass? Is this even possible with latex paints? (The regular ones, not the waterborne one.)

What I did was I thoroughly sanded the door, then primed (with Bullseye 123), then put on one coat of the paint.

Do I sand after priming as well? If I do that, won't it remove the primer, rendering it ineffective?

Thanks for your help!
 
  #2  
Old 09-02-05, 04:25 AM
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You'd like how a glossy oil paint looks
Brush applied
A light sanding between each coat
Some have difficulty working with oil
The technique is a little different
Personally I like working with it
I don't know if that's an option for you, but you'd like the results for sure
 
  #3  
Old 09-02-05, 05:58 AM
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The primer must be sanded, if you are applying 2 coats of finish you should sand between coats. Latex enamel will never be as slick as oil base but with proper prep and quality paint latex can give a good job.
Primer is used to seal and raise the grain. Generally you are not sanding through the primer just making the surface slick. Slightly sanding through the primer is acceptable as long as it is minor.
 
  #4  
Old 09-02-05, 08:13 AM
drdealer
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Originally Posted by marksr
The primer must be sanded, if you are applying 2 coats of finish you should sand between coats. Latex enamel will never be as slick as oil base but with proper prep and quality paint latex can give a good job.
Primer is used to seal and raise the grain. Generally you are not sanding through the primer just making the surface slick. Slightly sanding through the primer is acceptable as long as it is minor.
I see. Now, what do you mean by "minor" or "slight" sanding? How about 150 grit? And I'm guessing it should be hand-sanding only?

Slickshift, what's the difference in technique for oil painting? As marksr suggested, I will probably be buying a quality paint anyway (most likely Benjamin Moore alkyds). Again, this is for windows, doors, trims and baseboards.

Thanks guys.
 
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Old 09-02-05, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by drdealer
Slickshift, what's the difference in technique for oil painting?
It's...different...more precise, less room for error
You must start and end at precise points on your project, and follow certain lines
You almost pull the paint and stretch it across the area for your "run"
That's what it makes me think of anyway
If you can't make it from point A to B in one "run", you must blend little "runs" together and overlap the wet paint w/o messing up your previous "run"
I think it's considered more difficult, but I enjoy it

All my customers in the last year or two have wanted latex interior trim, so my only oil lately has been exterior


I sort of dropped a bomb with that as it's not really a DIY thing, but I didn't know if you were opposed to it, or if it was still or un-available in your area
If you do it right it feels like glass

To be fair, the latex today is really good
I'm sure you will get a good finish with them

Oh and I'd use a finer sandpaper
Probably 220 (though I use 180 also)
And for sure hand sand it lightly
 
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Old 09-02-05, 03:30 PM
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Occasionally you might sand through the primer in an effort to make the surface smooth. If there are only small area with the primer removed it is usually ok to proceed with finish coat. If a lot of primer has been removed you need to reprime.
 
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Old 09-02-05, 03:34 PM
drdealer
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Originally Posted by slickshift
It's...different...more precise, less room for error
You must start and end at precise points on your project, and follow certain lines
You almost pull the paint and stretch it across the area for your "run"
That's what it makes me think of anyway
If you can't make it from point A to B in one "run", you must blend little "runs" together and overlap the wet paint w/o messing up your previous "run"
I think it's considered more difficult, but I enjoy it

All my customers in the last year or two have wanted latex interior trim, so my only oil lately has been exterior


I sort of dropped a bomb with that as it's not really a DIY thing, but I didn't know if you were opposed to it, or if it was still or un-available in your area
If you do it right it feels like glass

To be fair, the latex today is really good
I'm sure you will get a good finish with them

Oh and I'd use a finer sandpaper
Probably 220 (though I use 180 also)
And for sure hand sand it lightly
Thanks for trying to clarify it for me, but I am having trouble following your description! Firstly, I understand latex is really good, but I am not satisfied enough with the BM Aquaglo (anything more premium than this?) finish...it feels really rough and the brush marks are truly visible. This is after I sanded the trim down to a glass-smooth finish. And it also has that 'sticky' and 'soft' latexy feel to it (a previously oil painted surface in the house appeals to me much much more).

So, I have been deciding and debating that my entrance doors (front and side) should be smoother and more appealing, and I am pretty much decided that oil is the way to go. However, I didn't know about this technique difference you're referring to. So I'm not sure now...

Is it really that hard? I really do want that super smooth finish, but would be pointless if it were riddled with lap marks and stuff like you say.

Should I try then or there's no hope? Afterall, there's a proverb that says that one learns to cut down a tree by cutting down a tree.
 
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Old 09-02-05, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by drdealer
..my entrance doors (front and side) should be smoother and more appealing, and I am pretty much decided that oil is the way to go.

Is it really that hard? I really do want that super smooth finish, but would be pointless if it were riddled with lap marks and stuff like you say.

Should I try then or there's no hope?
Well, normally I wouldn't recommend it for a DIYer, it's just that your post clearly described what you were looking for

Is it really that hard? I never thought so
It's really by others reactions that I gather that it's percieved as difficult
It is not as forgiving as latex that's for sure
If you are one of those people that ends up with paint everywhere when you paint, then it's probably a bad idea

Please excuse my description, I was trying to describe the difference in technique as you asked, and not explain the technique

Originally Posted by drdealer
Should I try then or there's no hope? Afterall, there's a proverb that says that one learns to cut down a tree by cutting down a tree.
Maybe start with a bush
If you think you might want to try it, I think you should test or practice first
It may sound silly but it will give you an idea of what's going on, and if it's do-able
Get some quarts, or even testors if they are available
Ask at your local paint store
Gather up some test pieces of trim and "door"
Try it out on them, see how they come out, and how comfortable you are with it
 
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Old 09-02-05, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by drdealer
I am not satisfied enough with the BM Aquaglo (anything more premium than this?)
Try Ben Moore's Water-borne Satin Impervo.
Tools/dries like an oil, hard and slick surface.
It has a learning curve, it will sag and run if not careful, and can't be overworked. But if you like the look/feel of oil, in a latex product, this is the one for you.
CLICK HERE
 
  #10  
Old 09-02-05, 05:52 PM
drdealer
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Originally Posted by prowallguy
Try Ben Moore's Water-borne Satin Impervo.
Tools/dries like an oil, hard and slick surface.
It has a learning curve, it will sag and run if not careful, and can't be overworked. But if you like the look/feel of oil, in a latex product, this is the one for you.
CLICK HERE
Yeah, I wish I could get my hands on this, however, they don't seem to sell in Canada. That's why I'm left with oil as the only option to get a glassy durable finish.

Alright, I guess I'll try test-painting first on sample pieces. Slickshift: just on the side, when you said start with a bush, I had no idea what you were saying. Afterall, you cannot paint plants, right? Then I realized the connection to the proverb!

Thanks guys. I'm determined to get oil up on the door, and I will do whatever I can to make sure it is so. I'll update you guys if I go ahead with it!
 
 

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