Best Way to Paint Plywood Furniture


  #1  
Old 09-11-05, 05:12 PM
redfish
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Best Way to Paint Plywood Furniture

1) What is the best way to paint plywood tables and bookcases to minimize formaldehyde fumes and VOCs, especially in humity?

2) What is the easiest way to "fix" plywood furniture already painted with latex paint? I have painted a bunch of furniture thinking this would seal the wood, but headache inducing odors continue to exist after 12+ months. I am unable to keep the furniture in the house because the combined fumes of all the furniture is too much. I have since learned that latex is porous so it probably isn't sealing jack. Using a sprayer, i did two coats Killz2 primer and 3 coats latex enamel black paint. Hopefully i don't have to get back down to the bare wood for a solution.

Thanks for the advice.
 
  #2  
Old 09-11-05, 05:52 PM
M
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Welcome to the forum

Don't know if I have answer for you. Latex paints breathe while oil base dries harder with better sealing properties. Of course oil paint has higher VOC's. Maybe a coat of oilbase poly applied [at another location] will sufficently seal the furniture. I assume your best bet is having furniture [and other things] that have no properties that you are allergic to. Although I personally have no problems with different odors, fumes etc I understand how hard it can be on a person that does.
 
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Old 09-11-05, 06:45 PM
S
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Hi redfish,
Latex is pretty much the low-odor method
Perhaps it is the brand of paint, maybe they have something in it that bothers you
Check with your local independent paint shop for the best low-odor products they have
 
  #4  
Old 09-25-05, 12:25 PM
redfish
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I do not believe the VOCs is the big issue here. I have painted things using spray paint, and that kind of paint has high VOCs. However, over time (within a few months), the fumes dissipate to a point where i cannot smell anything. Likewise, the sicky sweet smell from the Latex paint chemicals will disappear within 6 months. I am left with the fumes coming from the wood. This will last for many years, especially in humid hot conditions.

If Latex paint is porous, then it breathes. This DOES NOT seal. This is no good when one is dealing with plywood or treated wood that is normally used in houses with a vapor barrier. Latex paint fails to give you any vapor barrier. So you are exposed directly to fumes from the wood. Latex paint cans should have a WARNING on them informing consumers that the paint does not seal. This is product liability if people can be harmed by exposure to the fumes from new wood.

So the only serious solutions for my sealing problem seems to be oil or epoxy. I wish i knew before. I hope oil does a good enough job. Luckily i live in state that still sells oil paint. If anybody thinks of painting NEW wood furniture with Latex, think again. I will NEVER use Latex to paint wood furniture again. It is only good for walls and ceilings- that have a proper vapor barrier.
 
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Old 09-25-05, 05:10 PM
M
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For most people latex will do a sufficent job. Since it is a realitivly small group of people that suffer from fumes,glues etc. it is best dealt with on an individual basis. Hope you getthe problems with your furniture resolved
 
 

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