How to cover red paint


  #1  
Old 10-02-05, 02:21 PM
Chant
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How do I cover red paint on walls?

Hello! About two years ago, (in a moment of genius ) I painted my bedroom dark red using high gloss paint. The room is really stunning but now I am a bit tired of the cave my husband and I sleep in.

I would like some advice on how to paint the walls a lighter color without using 500 coats of paint.

Suggestions?
 

Last edited by Chant; 10-02-05 at 02:33 PM. Reason: add question mark
  #2  
Old 10-02-05, 05:01 PM
M
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First sand the gloss a little, then use a good latex primer and 1-2 coats of quality paint. Good paint almost always has better coverage and hiding properties than cheaper paint.
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-05, 08:04 PM
J
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You can skip the sanding if you use this tinted to a color close to the finish coat. Then just topcoat.
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-05, 04:17 AM
S
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I strongly recommend sanding the surface of gloss paint before repainting
Just a light sanding should do it
I prefer sanding screens on a pole, it goes pretty quickly that way
A good primer, and good quality paint, 1-2 coats depending on color should do it
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-05, 07:53 AM
J
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As usual joneq is curious as to the reason anybody would recommend sanding when it is not necessary. There would seem to be only a few choices. I wonder if we could here at least one[not including getting crap out of the old paint job or adding extra adhesion to something that is already stuck like glue after cure].

Also keep in mind that 123 does not develop full adhesion for maybe a month or so. So trying to peel it right after you apply it does not apply. I know that If there is a problem using the 123,or any of their products, as they describe they would want to know about it.

From the Zinsser site about 123

Interior and exterior
Sticks to all surfaces without sanding
Seals stains, graffiti and tannin bleed
Mold & mildew resistant film
Rust inhibitive – great for new metal
Fast 1 hour dry time

"Bulls Eye 1-2-3 is ready to recoat in just 1 hour and can be tinted toward the color of your topcoat to eliminate the need for one coat of paint—saving both time and money."
 
  #6  
Old 10-03-05, 09:14 AM
M
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Sanding prior to painting is always a good idea. Although the use of some products eliminate the necessity of sanding it is still a good idea to sand first. It is always better to do a job better than needed than to to not do it good enough
 
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Old 10-03-05, 09:22 AM
S
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Originally Posted by marksr
Sanding prior to painting is always a good idea. Although the use of some products eliminate the necessity of sanding it is still a good idea to sand first. It is always better to do a job better than needed than to to not do it good enough
I have to agree
I even sand non-glossy surfaces
It doesn't take up that much time or materials
That way I can trust it's done right
 
  #8  
Old 10-03-05, 03:11 PM
J
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There was no mention by anyone other than joneq about Zinsser 123 primer specifically. Everybody else was talking about a good latex primer or a good primer[oil, latex????].

If you use a good latex primer sanding is not optional over glossy paint, and would not be doing more than the the job required. I would do more than a light sanding if I was just using a good latex primer. I would do a thorough sanding.

There is also the distinct possibility that Chant does not own a pole sander or at least a pad sander and would be doing the sanding by hand. Something I don't think a pro would do, and If he did he would be getting paid to do it.

The process is much more when sanding is involved. If I was going to sand I would first clean the walls[don't want to grind the dirt in] next I would sand, then at least sweep the walls and the vacuum the floor,possibly vacuum the walls and floor

Cleaning is mandatory and not optional imo whichever way you go, but it produce no dust and eliminates all removal and associated tasks involved with sanding. It is clean and paint......Using 123 is not overkill or underkill it is using the right product for the right job

Nobody mentioned to tint the primer either. Chant wanted to know how to paint without doing exessive coats. Tinting the primer toward the finish coat is the best way imo.It may still need 2 finish coats, but definitely no more and possible 1 if the primer can be tinted to the exact color. Not tinting it will definitely insure at least 2 coats imo

I am all in favor of doing a great job, but I am never in favor of creating work for me or anyone else to do. I am sure that in the end Chant will put more weight on the side of sanding, but her opinion will probably be based more on who is saying it and less on the facts.

It really boils down to the fact that Zinsser Bullseye 123 sticks to glossy surfaces. It is probably the only primer anyone will ever need interior or exterior imo, And way more than anyone would need on bedroom walls.

If I was painting formica or something like that I would consider sanding and probably would, even though it is not required.

All of the above is based on the Zinsser site and my personal experiences with 123. It has never let me down.I always apply it to a clean surface and let it dry completely.
 
 

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