Paint to stain transition


  #1  
Old 11-10-05, 09:04 AM
way2handy
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Paint to stain transition

Our main hall has 5 doorways all next to each other. Everything is stained mahogony. My wife wants to install wainscoting in the bedroom and paint it light yellow or white. What do we do about the transition where dark door casing meets painted wainscoting? She says paint trim and door in bedroom and leave outside alone. I say YUK! Any suggestions?
 
  #2  
Old 11-10-05, 11:23 AM
M
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Welcome to the forums

The correct way to paint the bed rm trim is to paint the bed rm side of the door including the 'toe edge' of the door [assuming the door swings in. The jamb would be painted up to the door stop. Done correctly the paint would not be visible from the hall while the door is shut.

One important thing to remember is you can't just paint over the stained/varnished woodwork. It needs to be sanded and primed with a good oil base or shellac primer. This will allow the finish paint to adhere to the varnish/poly.
 
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Old 11-10-05, 05:29 PM
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I'm with you, way2handy. I love stained woodwork. Once painted, it has to be painted everytime you paint that room. But the wishes of SWMBO have to be considered.

What about the baseboards? Are they painted or stained? What about that "transition"? If you paint the door trim, you should also paint the baseboards.
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-05, 05:21 AM
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Painting over fresh stain?

I just stripped and stained with polyshades a nightstand and I am not happy with how it looks. Must not have been good wood for staining. Since it is still 'fresh', a little sticky, can I use an oil based paint to go over it? I am trying to get a darker, smoother brown.
 
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Old 11-13-05, 09:35 AM
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Polyshades is not a stain but a tinted polyurathane. It can be top coated with oil base paint but you need to let it dry first and then sand before painting.
 
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Old 11-13-05, 03:54 PM
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Before painting, try a second coat of the polyshades to see if it improves.

What type of wood is it? Pine and other soft woods need a pre-stain applied first. The pre-stain is basically colorless stain.
 
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Old 11-13-05, 05:37 PM
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Not sure what kind of wood it is. It was a blonde and gold paint before I stripped it yesterday. I did see some wood grain. The wood is very hard and not very porous. I put two coats of polyshades yesterday and it was streaky and didn't look good.

Since it was too red for me anyway, I went back to the store and bought some high quality satin finish expresso color spray paint. I did one thin coat and a few overcoats and it is very nice and uniform now, and the dark brown I wanted.

I DID sand it a little before spraying it today.

Thanks!
 
 

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