Removing paint from ceiling beams

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  #1  
Old 12-06-05, 11:35 PM
cottrellt
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Removing paint from ceiling beams

I have the dreaded popcorn ceiling in my living room which is white. A previous owner painted the beams on the ceiling to match the white of the ceiling. I would like to have these beams restored to their original wood and stained to match the fireplace and cabinet wood in the room. Is this possible?

tia
 
  #2  
Old 12-07-05, 07:27 AM
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Possible but maybe not practical. You would need to strip and sand the beams which may not be an easy task given their location. Are you sure there is stain grade wood under the paint? Is overlaying wood on top of the beams feasible?
 
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Old 12-07-05, 10:41 AM
cottrellt
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Removing paint from ceiling beams

Well, I know the beams are wood. I'm not sure what you mean by stain grade paint. I would like for them to be wood looking again. I saw a show on DIY where they had the beams stained to match the wood in the room and it gave me the idea. I really don't like the way they look painted white. It does seem like it would be a tedious (to use a word) job to remove the paint and then stain it, but if it can be done, I want to have it done.

tia
 
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Old 12-07-05, 12:26 PM
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Stain grade would be all one piece of wood as opposed to finger joint [small pieces joined together] Also occasionally beams will be laminated with masonite which isn't stainable.

The odds are that it is real wood, as I said before it will be a job. If the beams are removable it would make the stripping process easier. If you have to strip them in place some sort of scaffolding might make the job easier.
 
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Old 12-08-05, 09:00 PM
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This is the type of job we lovingly call a nightmare.

Be ready to either spend a lot of time and effort, and I mean A LOT, or spend a lot of $$$ to get it done professionally. And depending on the type of wood, and type of primer/paint used, there is no guarantee you will ever get it back to stain grade.

Scaffolding and a belt sander would be a good start if you choose to tackle this yourself.
 
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Old 12-08-05, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by prowallguy
Scaffolding and a belt sander would be a good start...
...and some 10 grit
Do they make 10 grit?

Overlaying is the only option I'd consider....or seen for that situation
 
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Old 12-08-05, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
...and some 10 grit
Do they make 10 grit?
I use 36 grit floor sanding paper. Cuts to the bone quick.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-05, 09:56 PM
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Sweet...
Yeah I got some for "Heinous Decks"
(I'm on the Corner of River and Ocean, "The Land of Rust and Mildew" ya know)
 
 

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