The "perfect" paint job

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  #1  
Old 01-11-06, 06:49 AM
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The "perfect" paint job

I'm just finishing up the deal to purchase my first home. Because both my fiancÚ and I won't be living there for several months we have a unique opportunity to upgrade/fix/paint the place without any hassles of having furniture or trying to live there with the smell of paint.


So I'd like to paint the whole place right.


The existing walls are covered in a dark blue paint that looks rather new (probably to help sell the house). I have no idea what's under the walls yet as I can't start messing around until my close date.

What would be the best way to proceed? I'm thinking of removing all trim and sanding the walls down after checking how many layers I'm working with. I'd then prime it and put on 2 coats of paint. I'd also paint the ceiling in all the rooms that don't need a repair (kitchen has some ceiling water damage from an old leak).

If I find too many layers of paint under the blue paint (I'm thinking a good 3-4 layers of old paint) I might strip all the paint chemically. Would stripping the paint be useful if I find lots of old paint but in good condition?


Any tips, ideas or thoughts?


Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 01-11-06, 07:43 AM
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Hi badmana
Welcome to the forums
I can split up your questions so hopefully my advice will make sense
Please don't hesitate to ask any questions or ask for specifics

Originally Posted by badmana
What would be the best way to proceed?
I'm thinking of removing all trim...
Removing the trim is OK
It's a fair amount of work, and some may be damaged during removal
Normally I would not remove the trim
The labor is the same if you remove the trim and replace it with the same, or new trim
It's just that if you bust it, or it is attached by liquid nails, you'll have the added expense of buying new trim, whether you want to or not, and painting that...whether you want to or not
Originally Posted by badmana
...and sanding the walls down after checking how many layers I'm working with.
Sanding is good, but there's no need to sand them "down" unless the current paint has adhesion issues
A light scuff sanding (I prefer a sanding screen on a pole) should be sufficient for most of the walls
Be sure to wipe off any dust from sanding before painting (I prefer a swiffer on a stick for that)
Originally Posted by badmana
I'd then prime it and put on 2 coats of paint.
I'd prime the dark blue if you are putting up a lighter color, or if the existing paint is glossy
Be sure to use good quality paints and primers, brushes and rollers
It will make a big difference, especially on such a big project
Originally Posted by badmana
I'd also paint the ceiling in all the rooms that don't need a repair (kitchen has some ceiling water damage from an old leak).
If you do repaint ceilings with spots/stains, be sure to use a stain sealer first
Originally Posted by badmana
If I find too many layers of paint under the blue paint (I'm thinking a good 3-4 layers of old paint) I might strip all the paint chemically. Would stripping the paint be useful if I find lots of old paint but in good condition?
There is no need to remove that much paint
In fact, if their is pre-'80s paint on there anywhere, it could be a very bad idea (lead paint)
Stripping generally does not work on walls, nor is it needed
If the walls are at the point where they need stripping, re drywalling is generally the best option

Clean, sand, prime, paint
Remove the trim if you want, but it's not needed and it's added time and money
Don't remove paint, just sand it a little
Seal any stains

That should work
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-06, 08:05 AM
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Thanks for the welcome Slickshift!

About 70% of the baseboards are already gone. I think the people who 'spruced' up the place painted it quickly without replacing the boards. Since I'm more than half way there I'm going to remove the rest so everything matches up when I replace it.

Regarding sanding. I was going to pick up a 5" orbital sander (mostly for future repairs). Would something like that be over-kill or even damage the surface for repainting? I figured on going over the wall quickly with 150 grit paper after a good washing of the walls then prime and paint.

I was worried about lead in the paint. Would the new surface paint effectively protect us from future lead problems? The paint on the walls is a not very glossy. I have no idea how good the paint itself is but the job is decent (no peeling or visable problems). I simply want to change the colour to white and want to do a super-good job of it so I won't have to worry about it!


Thanks for the advice!
 
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Old 01-11-06, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by badmana
About 70% of the baseboards are already gone. I think the people who 'spruced' up the place painted it quickly without replacing the boards. Since I'm more than half way there I'm going to remove the rest so everything matches up when I replace it.
I would agree
That's the best plan in this case
Originally Posted by badmana
Regarding sanding. I was going to pick up a 5" orbital sander (mostly for future repairs). Would something like that be over-kill or even damage the surface for repainting? I figured on going over the wall quickly with 150 grit paper after a good washing of the walls then prime and paint.
Proabably a litle over-kill, unless there is a good amount of rough surfaces
I always have my palm and 5" orbital on hand, but rarely pull tham out for repaints
A light scuff sanding is usually all that's needed, and my screen on pole works great for that, and works quickly also
Normal re-paint prep doesn't need a lot of material removal, just a good suface for adhesion
Originally Posted by badmana
I was worried about lead in the paint. Would the new surface paint effectively protect us from future lead problems? The paint on the walls is a not very glossy. I have no idea how good the paint itself is but the job is decent (no peeling or visable problems). I simply want to change the colour to white and want to do a super-good job of it so I won't have to worry about it!
If there is paint from the '70s or earlier, lead is a possibilty
If it has been painted since then (and it sounds like it), it's encapsualted, and safe (unless you go sanding down to those layers)

The existing paint sounds fine, I'd primer mostly because of the color change
Use a good quality primer, paint, brushes, and roller/sleeves and it should go up and stay up with no worries
 
  #5  
Old 01-11-06, 09:56 AM
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I would add - prime or stain the new base before installing - makes life easier.
 
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Old 01-11-06, 10:56 AM
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I figure I'll lightly sand with a block on a pole (if that's the prefered method) and then prime the walls. I'll also have to remember to crank the temp up in the house to prevent freezing (since no one will be around at night we've been keeping the heat barely on).


For the baseboards I'm not sure what I want to do with them. Do I need to stain them to prevent them from damage? I don't mind a 'raw wood' look unless of course it'll mean I have to replace them next year!



Thanks for all the advice/help!
 
  #7  
Old 01-11-06, 01:39 PM
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You can leave the base raw but .... sooner or later they will get dirty and dingy looking, then you either have to sand them clean or paint them all of which means crawling around on your knees being sure not to mess up the floor.

If you want them stained [or natural] I would stain and apply 1-2 coats of varnish/poly on them before installing them.

You can buy a sanding pole most anywhere paint and drywall products are sold. It is ok for the house to get as low as 35-40 degrees several hours after the paint is applied but the air temp [and more importantly wall temp] must be atleast 50 degrees before painting.
 
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Old 01-11-06, 08:08 PM
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All good advice.

Unless you have the water shut off, leave the thermostat set no lower than 65. Lower than that and you run the risk of frozen pipes.
 
  #9  
Old 01-11-06, 11:41 PM
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Keep your paint and primer someplace warm. Paint stored in unheated areas performs very poorly.
 
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