New paint - walls "bleeding" after shower use

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-17-06, 11:16 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
New paint - walls "bleeding" after shower use

I just painted my bathroom ( Washed walls with TSP first, then put 2 coats of CIL Kitchen/Bath paint on ).

Before I painted, there were brown marks that would appear out of no where and run down the wall when the shower was used and the hot water ran for awhile (The fan is turned on).

So I washed it with TSP, put two coats on.

Now I've noticed that the brown (Doesn't seem as dark) is still coming through the paint when there is a really hot shower. I can't see this as being normal?


I know the house was smoked in, is this going to be permanent without ripping out the drywall?


EDIT: There is also condensation on all the walls after the shower. Does this mean the fan I have is inadaquate (It's just an ensuite bathroom)? Or the bathroom is too cold (I keep it around 61 deg F / 16deg C)?
 

Last edited by TrevorK; 01-17-06 at 11:29 AM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-17-06, 04:39 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Are they actual drips, or more like a stain that bleeds through in high humidity?
Does it/they disapear if the shower is not used for a while or does it/they remain?
 
  #3  
Old 01-17-06, 06:20 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
More info would help. Worst case senario would involve sealing the walls with a solvent based primer and then recoating with latex enamel.
 
  #4  
Old 01-17-06, 09:51 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by slickshift
Are they actual drips, or more like a stain that bleeds through in high humidity?
Does it/they disapear if the shower is not used for a while or does it/they remain?
I'm not sure - I'd like to classify them as drips. I can run a paper towel over top of them and the paper towel will turn brown. You can see a trail - you know how if a water droplet dripped down the wall you'd see the bottom part where the water drop sits and it gets progressively thinning as you move up? I see that on my walls.


No - the stains do not go away when the shower is unused for long periods of time.
 
  #5  
Old 01-17-06, 11:03 PM
mjd2k's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Canadian Prairies
Posts: 352
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Exact same thing happens in my bathroom which is also an ensuite. My house has never been smoked in so you can elimate that issue.

I had yellow paint before and I thought it was part of the pigment running. Now I have gone with a taupe color. This time I never used kitchen and bath because I don't like gloss very much.

Still get some brown drips but no runs.

Interestingly, we have another shower 4 inches away on the other side of the wall and there are are no brown spots even though its the same paint. Four people use the main shower while I'm the only one using the ensuite. My bathroom is cold also but I don't think my fan works verywell eithe

No answers here but I'm interstedto see if someone has a solution.
 
  #6  
Old 01-18-06, 06:29 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mjd2k
I had yellow paint before and I thought it was part of the pigment running. Now I have gone with a taupe color. This time I never used kitchen and bath because I don't like gloss very much.
Underneath the new paint I put on there is a cream/white colour, and underneath that there is a yellow/green colour with mine....

I'd like to think that the paint shouldn't bleed through since I put 2 coats of the new stuff on?
 
  #7  
Old 01-18-06, 06:44 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
I wouldn't think it would be old paint bleeding through but rather some type of contaminent leaking through. Solvent based paints [or primers] seal better than latex. I believe they say that the molecules are closer together with solvent based material.

Hopefully if you coat the walls with a shellac or oil base primer and then repaint it will correct the problem.

BTW it is always best to use some type of enamel in any bath that has a shower. Satin is fine if you don't like much sheen.
 
  #8  
Old 01-18-06, 08:41 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello,
from the way you are describing this, sounds like this is what you may have happening: Surfactant Leaching
hope this helps some.

Here is an article :

http://www3.sherwin.com/do_it_yourse...ntLeaching.jsp


Surfactant Leaching




DESCRIPTION

Concentration of water-soluble paint ingredients called “surfactants” on the surface of a latex paint. May be evident as tan, brown, or clear spots or areas, and can sometimes be glossy, soapy, oily, or sticky.
POSSIBLE CAUSE

• Latex paints contain surfactants designed to make applying them possible. All latex paint formulas will exhibit this tendency to some extent if applied in areas where moisture (rain, dew, high humidity, showers, laundry rooms, etc.) can come in contact with an uncured latex paint.
• Cool temperatures will retard the paint’s curing process, which can allow surfactants to separate out and float to the top of the coating.
• Moisture accumulating on a fresh latex paint will retard the paint’s drying. This moisture may extract and concentrate different water-soluble materials from within the paint onto the paint surface. When the water evaporates, a concentrated residue is left behind, causing staining, unsightly runs, and gloss patterns.
SOLUTION

See Lead Information.

Inside: Wash the affected area with soap and water, and rinse. The discoloration may occur once or twice again before the surfactant is completely removed. When paint is applied in a bathroom, it should dry thoroughly before using the bath or shower. Remove as much staining as possible before repainting.




ALSO:

Surfactant Leaching

Cause:

All latex paints contain detergent-like materials called surfactants which are necessary for the stability of the paint formulation. In cases where surfactant is leaching from the dried film, this material will dissipate in small amounts. They tend to come out of the film slowly and are easily removed by normal weathering. Under certain curing conditions, such as low temperatures, condensing moisture, etc., this leaching process occurs rapidly and results in a surfactant build-up on the surface. Leached surfactant can appear as a thick brown syrup-like deposit or rundown. On occasion it may assume a white crystalline form. Surfactant leaching is not limited to exterior coatings - it may appear in bathrooms or other areas where moisture condenses on walls. In these instances, a clear amber glossy rundown will be visible.

Solution:

Most often, weathering removes the visible film of surfactant from the surface. The sheen and the color are restored. However, most accumulations of surfactant are observed in areas protected from natural weathering. In these instances, it can be removed with a fine mist from a garden hose or by light rubbing with a wet cloth. Often the best solution is to do nothing and let nature take its course. The surfactant will do no harm and time will correct the problem. Surfactants must be removed prior to painting.
 
  #9  
Old 01-18-06, 04:32 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Great info there, WALLS&PAINT
Thanks
 
  #10  
Old 01-19-06, 09:22 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by marksr
I wouldn't think it would be old paint bleeding through but rather some type of contaminent leaking through. Solvent based paints [or primers] seal better than latex. I believe they say that the molecules are closer together with solvent based material.

Hopefully if you coat the walls with a shellac or oil base primer and then repaint it will correct the problem.

BTW it is always best to use some type of enamel in any bath that has a shower. Satin is fine if you don't like much sheen.
I'm a newbie to painting - but I thought that the only paint types were latex and oil-based? Where does enamel fit it?
 
  #11  
Old 01-19-06, 09:24 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by WALLS&PAINT
Hello,
from the way you are describing this, sounds like this is what you may have happening: Surfactant Leaching
hope this helps some.
Wow - that sounds a lot like what I have. It would make sense - perhaps because of the temperature of my house it didn't have enough time to dry...

Am I to understand that the solution is to wash the walls, and that it's a temporary thing?
 
  #12  
Old 01-19-06, 12:34 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
Originally Posted by TrevorK
I'm a newbie to painting - but I thought that the only paint types were latex and oil-based? Where does enamel fit it?


Latex and oil are the 2 most common paints. There is also shellac which today is used primarly for priming hard to cover stains.

Enamel comes in both latex and oil. Enamel is the term for a harder drying paint which has a gloss [comes in different sheens] Flat paint comes in both latex and oil.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: