Questions on Sprayer and Cabinet re-painting


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Old 01-20-06, 06:25 PM
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Questions on Sprayer and Cabinet re-painting

Hello.

I am wanting to paint my living room and kitchen cabinets. They are stained with some kind of varnish over them. Probably 30 years old or so, since my home was built in the 70s and I'm trying to de-70s it.

The thought of hand painting all of the cabinets with 2 or 3 coats is horrifying. Seems like it would take forever. The whole wall in the living room is covered with these cabinets and shelving. So I thought using a spray gun to do this would be the best option.

I would like to use a latex based paint.

Assuming I have everything covered up and masked off in the room....

1) Is using a spray gun the best method to do this task?

2) Which type of spraygun should I use...I'm assuming a pump type (non air). Any suggestions on models? I'd like to spend less than $200.

3) Do I need to use a coat of primer, or can I just paint over the current finish?

4) Looking ahead, I also will be needing to re-paint my exterior trim and some siding (I have a half brick house). Is there a type/model that would also serve this purpose, along with the cabinets?

Thanks for any suggestions/help.

H
 
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Old 01-20-06, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by MrHeatmiser
Hello.

I am wanting to paint my living room and kitchen cabinets. They are stained with some kind of varnish over them. Probably 30 years old or so, since my home was built in the 70s and I'm trying to de-70s it.

The thought of hand painting all of the cabinets with 2 or 3 coats is horrifying. Seems like it would take forever. The whole wall in the living room is covered with these cabinets and shelving. So I thought using a spray gun to do this would be the best option.

I would like to use a latex based paint.

Assuming I have everything covered up and masked off in the room....
Originally Posted by MrHeatmiser
1) Is using a spray gun the best method to do this task?
I'd say yes if your are at all experienced with spraying. If not, it could turn into a mess real quick.

Originally Posted by MrHeatmiser
2) Which type of spraygun should I use...I'm assuming a pump type (non air). Any suggestions on models? I'd like to spend less than $200.
An HVLP would work best for this, but will never find one for less than $200. A possibility would be trying to rent one at a paint store. An airless could be used, but not as effectively as an HVLP.

Originally Posted by MrHeatmiser
3) Do I need to use a coat of primer, or can I just paint over the current finish?
Definitely need to prime the old varnish/poly/whatever is on there. A good sanding and cleaning are a must. I use oil primer for these appications, though some say a high-quality acrylic will work. I still prefer the oil for maximum adhesion.

Originally Posted by MrHeatmiser
4) Looking ahead, I also will be needing to re-paint my exterior trim and some siding (I have a half brick house). Is there a type/model that would also serve this purpose, along with the cabinets?
An airless rig is usually used on exterior applications.
 
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Old 01-20-06, 10:32 PM
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Mr. Heatmiser,

The actual painting of cabinets and doors seems to take minutes. For me the time was spent setting up and then waiting for things to dry before the next coat could be applied.

I just had a maybe-bad experience with a latex primer over varnish. If I was to do it again, I would probably use Bin.

Funny how we all seem to be painting cabinets lately. Wonder if its the weather?
 
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Old 01-21-06, 04:40 AM
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You'll need an oil or shellac primer and two coats latex

Unless you've got a ton of cabs, I don't think it's worth spraying
If you've never used one, then a big no on the spray

PS I just moved into a house with the groovy '70s dark cabinets
If I were to paint these, I might even go BIN shellac-based primer (rather than oil)
It's harder to use and smellier (fresh air and a respirator)
But they are very dark and very shiny and that makes me want to BIN them
 
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Old 01-21-06, 04:41 AM
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PS
MrHeatmiser, I loved you in that movie
Great song too
 
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Old 01-21-06, 07:33 AM
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Yes, yes I was good in that movie wasn't I?

Anyhoo, seems that there are a couple of suggestions that I should stay away from trying to spray them..if I'm not an experienced sprayer -- which I'm not..I've done some, but not a lot of it.

Just seems that the time to do it would be cut significantly.

What are the pitfalls of spraying...that are causing you guys to suggest I stay away from spraying?

Thanks for the comments.

H
 
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Old 01-21-06, 01:46 PM
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The problem with spraying by the inexperienced is that is so easy to make a mess. Uneven paint application is only a minor problem as thin spots can be recoated and runs and drips can be sanded. There is a lot of prep involved in spraying. Overspray has a nasty habit of floating anywhere it wants. An incomplete job of masking and covering can leave overspray on items that may remind you for years to come of the mistake you made.

There are a lot of small rollers on the market that can make short work of painting cabinets. Depending on your expertise with a roller [and using the right roller cover and paint] a nice job can be done. For most DIYers this is the best method to paint cabinets.

Most paint stores [not depts] can guide you with the correct materials and equipment to apply it with.
 
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Old 01-21-06, 04:00 PM
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So, a nice finish can be had with using a roller?

I guess this was my main concern. When I said hand painting, I was referring to using a brush for the whole job. I had thought a roller would not have left a very good finish.

If I can get a roller to leave a decent finish, then I'll go that route if I can.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 12:27 PM
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I have used a foam roller to paint cabinets in the past and had good results.
 
 

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