Did I ruin my brush

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  #1  
Old 01-23-06, 08:10 AM
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Did I ruin my brush

I left a brush out and paint dried on it. Its notcompletelyhard but pretty stiff.

Ive had it sitting in water (it is a latex paint) but it hsnt loosed up.

It wasnt that expensive - $12 or so. So, it wont break thebank, but I hate wasting if this can be fixed.

If I let it sit in paint thinner, will that save the brush?
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:49 AM
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The paint store will probably have a product (I can't remember the name) that will loosen up stiff paint covered bristles. Its a granular product in a small bag and works well. You could also try a paint comb. I wouldn't use paint thinner for latex though.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:56 AM
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Yes, you pooched it
No, thinner won't help
The stuff at the paint shop will
However, it's probably about $12
It's re-usable though, you can save it for next time
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:58 AM
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Paint stores sell a brush cleaner made just for this. Personally I would use a wire brush first and see how it does. Detergent may also help. Paint thinner wouldn't have much effect on latex paint.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 12:04 PM
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sounds like - for the effort and price involved - I might as well just get a new brush.

Im going to be painting a lot of trim. What size/type do you recommend. Ill be using a latex paint. I dont need a top of the line so Im not overly concerned about super quality - Im assuming anyaveragely priced brush will do. But is there a certain size/type/style that is best for trim?
 
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Old 01-23-06, 12:21 PM
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I use and recommend a 2 1/2 angled brush
I also think you are selling yourself short as to the quality of brush
JTLYK, I'm not a spoiled pro that thinks cheap brushes are beneath him lol
Really, if I could lower my equipment costs w/o affecting quality or time spent (time=money), I would do so
It's just that a good quality brush will make my, and the DIYers job much more pleasant, easier, faster
Really it does

A good 2 1/2 Purdy or Corona, well worth it
 
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Old 01-23-06, 01:19 PM
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I hope I didnt come across as trivializing what a pro does in any way.

But, with respect to brushes, how does a good brush help the quality of a paint job? I canunderstand that it doesnt leave bristle in the paint. I use a cheap chip brush for my shellac based primer work so I can just toss them. Im surprised to see any brisles left on the brush considering what I end up pulling out of the paint as I go.

But how does the brush help other than that.. and how does it make the job LOOK better? Does it or is it just a time saver?

Will a novice notice/and be able to take advantage of a quality brush?
 
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Old 01-23-06, 03:26 PM
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A quaility brush makes painting easier. Not just how it holds and distributes paint but it also makes cutting a straight [or any other kind] line easier. It would be hard for me or any other pro to do a good job with a cheap brush.

BTW I would rather use an old worn out good brush for material that the thinner/cleaner is too expensive to use.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by rkoudelka
I hope I didnt come across as trivializing what a pro does in any way.
No, no, not at all
It's just there's a lot of cheap brushes out there
The brushes pros use are not that much more than a middle quality brush
And well worth every penny, even for a DIYer
 
  #10  
Old 01-23-06, 11:16 PM
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Oh you definitely ruined your brush.
There are a couple of ways to ruin a brush and that is one of them. I recommend buying a new quality brush and washing it after every 3-4 hours of consistant painting. I find that depending on the temp and humidity, you'll start leaving chunks on the wall or trim. Also, you'll start wiping chunks into your paint container, then the rest of the job isn't going to turn out looking very good.

I haven't found anyway to get the brush back to its original condition without extensive work. And even then, the likelyhood of the brush leaving brushmarks are very high.

Hope this helps,
Dan
 

Last edited by Annette; 01-24-06 at 02:37 PM. Reason: personal business website in signature/removed
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