20-24 foot walls and ceilings


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Old 02-18-06, 02:57 PM
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20-24 foot walls and ceilings

I need to bid on a job that involves 20-24 foot high walls and ceilings. Iíve never painted anything higher than a 16-foot staircase. To me, it seems Iíll need an electric lift of some sort to work efficiently. Using ladders and scaffolding may be a slow, inefficient process, but what do I know?

In the past 10-15 years or so, a lot of big homes have been built in my area with 20-foot ceilings. People that own these homes are not usually DIYers. I can probably justify buying some special equipment to offer painting services to these homeowners.

Any suggestions?
 
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Old 02-18-06, 07:09 PM
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WBP
Check this out
I don't have a large enough need, or space, or transportation for scaffolding
So I'd rent
Sounds good, and you'd think that's work out fine
And it's not that expensive...on paper
But really, here's what happens
I have to beg and borrow a good sized truck (F350)
I've got a friend that has one, no problem...on paper
But really here's what happens

I spend an enormous amount of time chasing after my friend and his truck (if he isn't using it) and the keys and gassing it up and returning it
Picking up the scaffolding, loading it, off-loading it....

Once the scaffolding is on site, now I have to assemble it
And dissassemble it when I'm done, and get the truck again....etc...etc...

You're getting the idea

So, I'd have them deliver it, and pick it up
Sounds good right?
It's OK, but it adds a fair amount to the cost, and I still have to assemble it...a fair amount of time

So, I found out for a bit more than the cost of renting scaffolding, I can get an 18 foot push around
This is a brochure for the series, I get the littlest one, it's 18 or 20 feet
http://www.midwestaerials.com/AWP%20SUPER%20SERIES.pdf

It seems more expensive, and it is, technically
But figure the delivery for the scaffolding or the push around is the same
And when I figure in the time my one-man crew (me) lost messing with the scaffolding (assembling, moving), it was a no-brainer to spend the extra for the push around
I now figure that expense into the bid if it's needed

The hours of running around or assembling (=cursing) is now spent painting
It's delivered at 8AM, I'm painting by 8:15
I call them up when I'm done
Bim Bam Boom
For a one-man op, I'd consider it
 
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Old 02-19-06, 09:21 AM
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90% of the tall residential walls/ceilings I have painted have been done with extension ladders and extension roller poles. Never had any issues although it isn't always an easy job. The only time I've ever used scaffolding on residential jobs was when another trade already had them in place [sometimes deals were made to garuntee use] On the rare occasion that I needed special equipment, I would rent - figuring the cost into the bid.

If using an extension ladder indoors - use the socks/mittens that can be purchased to cover the ladder ends which helps to prevent marring of the wall. Use a pot hook to secure your bucket while working off the ladder. When hardwood floors are present it is often advisable/nesecarry to have someone to hold/secure the ladder.
 
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Old 02-19-06, 12:09 PM
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If I were younger and lighter, climbing up and down an extension ladder would be no big deal. But, at 52 years and 20 lbs overweight, a lot of ladder climbing is another matter. One room in the house is about 20 x 30 ft. With the walls being painted a different color than the ceiling, thatís a lot of ladder climbing to cut the ceiling edge. And, the floors ARE hardwood. Ouch!!

As a one-man operation, the Genie AWP looks real good. It would seem the time savings would offset much of the rental costs, and be a lot easier on my back and legs.

Thanks gentlemen!
 
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Old 02-19-06, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
90% of the tall residential walls/ceilings I have painted have been done with extension ladders and extension roller poles. Never had any issues although it isn't always an easy job. The only time I've ever used scaffolding on residential jobs was when another trade already had them in place [sometimes deals were made to garuntee use] On the rare occasion that I needed special equipment, I would rent - figuring the cost into the bid.

If using an extension ladder indoors - use the socks/mittens that can be purchased to cover the ladder ends which helps to prevent marring of the wall. Use a pot hook to secure your bucket while working off the ladder. When hardwood floors are present it is often advisable/nesecarry to have someone to hold/secure the ladder.
Same here.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 06:45 PM
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Well, Iím sure I could use an extension ladder to cut the ceiling edge (albeit slowly).

I find a 12-foot pole awkward to work with. And, at my height (5í 10Ē), even with a 12-foot pole I could only barely reach a 20-foot ceiling. I suppose I could paint the ceiling with a shorter pole and a stepladder or a 5-6 foot scaffold.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 05:40 AM
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Often on tall walls it is easier to roll off of a step ladder with a shorter pole. You can also get a 16' roller pole.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 10:35 AM
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I find poles more than 8-10 feet unwieldy. Maybe I just need more experience with them. I have a 12-foot pole but never extend it to the full 12 feet. I like the idea of a shorter pole and a stepladder. Thanks!
 
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Old 02-21-06, 04:50 PM
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Long poles can defiently take some getting used to - not for the feint of heart

If you ever stood on scaffolding, dipping the roller into a bucket of blockfill on the ground, rolling the first coat on a 30' tall block wall - you will have known you earned your pay.
 
 

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