roller marks on ceiling

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Old 02-19-06, 04:22 PM
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roller marks on ceiling

I just finished reading a couple past posts on this subject. I've got some ideas on how to fix it, but wanted to get more opinions.

I'm painting my ceiling and just finished the second coat. This is a very large area, probably about 27' x 27'. It's new drywall, so I figured a 3/8 nap roller would be good. After the second coat finished drying, I've got lap marks. I've read to get a good quality paint and sleeve, don't let the paint dry before you go over it again, use thicker nap roller, and use a flat paint to prevent this from happening.

I personally don't believe it's an issue with the paint. I helped my brother paint his new construction house, and he used Ben Moore and he still got the marks. He didn't use flat paint though. Hmmm...

Back to my situation, I'm using satin with a 3/8 nap. I can't paint without letting areas try because of the size of the room. So as I see it, it's either the fact that the paint isn't flat, or the size of the nap.

Any suggestions? Sorry I rambled on so long...
 
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Old 02-19-06, 06:10 PM
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Ceilings are the toughest
A good quality ceiling paint and quality roller sleeves are a must
A larger nap and flatter sheen help, but are not critical
They help cover for a DIYers lack of skill
A good painter can get a good ceiling with a 3/8th and semi

Originally Posted by jlaird
I'm painting my ceiling and just finished the second coat. This is a very large area, probably about 27' x 27'. It's new drywall, so I figured a 3/8 nap roller would be good. After the second coat finished drying, I've got lap marks.
Did you prime?
Originally Posted by jlaird
I've read to get a good quality paint and sleeve,
Yup
Originally Posted by jlaird
don't let the paint dry before you go over it again,
Ummm....that would be keep the edge of the part you just painted "wet" (don't let it dry-this is where "fast-drying paint" is bad), so when you start the spot next to it, and bring your roller into the painted spot, it's easier to "blend" the old spot and the new spot together with no lap marks
Originally Posted by jlaird
use thicker nap roller,
Most DIYers paint with too small a nap
It's not critical, but it's not helping, on a few different levels, especially a non-pro
Originally Posted by jlaird
and use a flat paint to prevent this from happening.
Again, not critical, but it''ll help cover a lack of technique
Originally Posted by jlaird
I personally don't believe it's an issue with the paint. I helped my brother paint his new construction house, and he used Ben Moore and he still got the marks. He didn't use flat paint though. Hmmm...
Don't under-estimate the technique
Originally Posted by jlaird
Back to my situation, I'm using satin with a 3/8 nap. I can't paint without letting areas try because of the size of the room. So as I see it, it's either the fact that the paint isn't flat, or the size of the nap.
None of which is helping your situation

OK lets get to your situation
So lets say you want to keep it satin, OK...get the 1/2" quality sleeve, Wooster or Purdy
You say it's not the paint because of a previous experience, it could be the paint
Make sure you've got good stuff
I'd recommend a ceiling paint, but I understand you want satin
If you've got a can of any wall paint from big orange or big blue there, dump it down the sink, go to your local paint shop and tell them what you want
Wall paint is OK but get the good stuff

Now, when your painting your small area, moving on to the next, moving quickly enough to keep a wet edge, but not so quick as to splatter...
Do Not try and squeeze every last drop out of the sleeve
You should not be pushing that hard
If your passes are leaving "darker" (thicker) trails on the outer edges of the roller, your pushing too hard
If you are not covering the pass area well at the end of the pass, you are pushing too hard, and leaving it on too long
Originally Posted by jlaird
So as I see it, it's either the fact that the paint isn't flat, or the size of the nap.
Don't under-estimate the technique
If anybody who could hold a roller could paint a good ceiling, I'd be out of a job
lol
 
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Old 02-19-06, 06:50 PM
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Hey, thanks for the help again. Tomorrow I'm going to get a 1/2 nap and try another coat. I don't really want to get new paint if I don't have to because I've already spent about $300 for this paint. Yes, it's American Tradition from lowes. I'm painting a lot of my house with it. I know it will be fine on the walls, but as you said, the ceiling is the hardest. I always paint my ceilings and walls with the same paint. (Just personal preference, don't like the different colors.) Oh, and I am always painting with a white or off-white.

It weird though, I painted both my bedroom and office with other no name paints that were eggshell and didn't have this problem at all. The only things that are different this time is size of room and switching from eggshell to satin. I painted my office with ColorPlace from Wallyworld, and my bedroom with Glidden Evermore and didn't have any problems.

Do you really think I should go out and get new paint for the ceiling? Isn't more technique than brand of paint?
 
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Old 02-19-06, 06:57 PM
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Let me ask you a question... how large of an area do you paint on a ceiling before you have to reload the roller?

(this is assuming you are using a 9" roller)

The reason I ask is because I think I do have a tendancy to push to hard leaving those visable edges. Then I find myself going over them to get rid of them.
 
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Old 02-19-06, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaird
Do you really think I should go out and get new paint for the ceiling? Isn't more technique than brand of paint?
If you can get to to work on the walls, well, I don't know, try the stuff you have if you'd like
I really have used the stuff, it really makes my job harder
Anything I save in materials gets eaten up by time spent, which is of course my main cost on a project so it ends up costing me and my customers more money, not less

That stuff is made for to DIYers who want it to "Dry Fast"
That means the paint doesn't leave a "wet edge", which DIYers don't know about
That leads to problems like you are having
 
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Old 02-19-06, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaird
Let me ask you a question... how large of an area do you paint on a ceiling before you have to reload the roller?

(this is assuming you are using a 9" roller)

The reason I ask is because I think I do have a tendancy to push to hard leaving those visable edges. Then I find myself going over them to get rid of them.
That depends on how it's going
It could be almost ten sq ft, or it could be three
If you didn't prime drywall it'll be sucking it up like....well, alot
You won't get much coverage

If you are squeezing, leaving lines, and going over again for lines (not coverage), then yeah, you're pushing it
 
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Old 02-20-06, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by jlaird
Let me ask you a question... how large of an area do you paint on a ceiling before you have to reload the roller? .



A lot is depended on the roller, paint and substrate. You shouldn't be pressing on the roller to squeeze paint out. Load the roller and when it starts to quit distributing paint [without using pressure] it is time to reload. Depending on the job/surface I often just slop the paint on and then use the roller to smooth it all out. Let the roller do its share of the work, keeping a wet roller makes the job easier with better results.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 02:41 PM
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Just got back from my search for the perfect sleeve! The best I could find without driving a fair distance was Ben Moore sleeves. Will these suffice? Nobody had Purdy or Wooster.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 04:34 PM
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I've used those when I couldn't get P or W
That should do just fine
 
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Old 02-20-06, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
... Load the roller and when it starts to quit distributing paint [without using pressure] it is time to reload. Depending on the job/surface I often just slop the paint on and then use the roller to smooth it all out. Let the roller do its share of the work, keeping a wet roller makes the job easier with better results.
That's a very good way of putting it marksr
Very well said
 
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Old 02-21-06, 09:23 AM
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ok, I just got done with third coat. No luck. This time I used the 1/2 nap and I got a second person to help.

It still looks bad.

I think the next thing to try is new flat paint.

Will it be ok if I put the flat over the satin?

This sucks!!!
 
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Old 02-21-06, 09:34 AM
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It shouldn't be a problem. Flat paint is also more forgiving. Remember quality paint always works better.
 
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