BM Regal or SW Superpaint - which one is better quality?

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Old 02-20-06, 11:06 AM
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BM Regal or SW Superpaint - which one is better quality?

Hello. I'm looking for a good quality (preferably one coat) interior paint to paint my new townhome in a few weeks. I am painting the ENTIRE townhome and I'm covering the builder-white walls with a neutral (not dark) color to be determined.

After a 20% off coupon, I can get Sherwin Williams Superpaint for $30/gallon and my local Benjamin Moore dealer charges $30 for Benjamin Moore Regal in Flat (no sales/coupons), so the price is the same.

So which one is better paint? If one of these two paints will give me better one coat coverage, it will be the better value for me. Opinions?

Thanks!!
 

Last edited by jkozlow3; 02-20-06 at 01:25 PM.
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Old 02-20-06, 11:31 AM
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Welcome to the forums

I only use B Moore paint occasionally but know that there top line paints are of good quality. I have used a lot of SWP and know they have quality paint. Super paint does work well. Coverage shouldn't be an issue but certain colors cover better than others. There are others on this site that use a lot of BM paint and I'm sure they will share their opinions later.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 12:33 PM
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I spec mostly Ben Moore
The regal should work well for you
I'd always recommend two coats for a color change regardless of the paint
But if it's not drastic (depending on the new color and old), and you are take care with the application, you shouldn't have a problem

As for Sherwin Williams, I can say I have been using more of them lately
It's more a supply issue with me, not a quality issue in the least
But I can say that their products are excellent and I would have no problem whatsoever using SWP SuperPaint if the customer wished
I wouldn't give it a second thought, in fact, I'd look forward to it

It does seem that SWP is a little more in price than comparable BM products

Taking into consideration my not having used SWP nearly as much as BM, I've so far come up with the opinion they are extremely comparable

Go with whoever will give you some free shirts and a hat
 
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Old 02-20-06, 01:17 PM
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You've picked two good paints here, either will be fine.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 03:36 PM
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Thanks for the responses. So what are the odds I'll be able to get by (and like the results) with one coat? Are there any better one coat products out there? Keep in mind, I'm only going from white to a light beigeish color.

If I'm going to need 2 coats anyway, maybe I should consider SW's slightly cheaper Classic 99 line?

Also, what do you guys recommend for sheen? I DO NOT like glossier paints, so I'd want to go relatively flat. SW Superpaint only comes in Flat & Satin and I'm afraid Satin might be too glossy for my taste. BM adds Eggshell to that list which might be a better choice. Can I use flat throughout the entire house, or do I need to use something slightly glossier in the kitchen & baths? What would YOU do for the different rooms if it were your house? Flat, Eggshell, Satin, and where?

Thanks again!!
 
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Old 02-20-06, 04:07 PM
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I like satin myself, but I can see that some might not want that level of shine. I think satin is still the best choice for a high moisture area like a bathroom, but you can make eggshell work if you do things like run the exhaust fan to help control moisture. Eggshell is usually sufficient for the rest of the house if you want something with a little durability. Flat will be the cheapest and easiest paint to use, but it's the least durable - no small kids, less of a concern. I would still go with the top of the line paint, your odds of needing a second coat go down this way.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by jkozlow3
Thanks for the responses. So what are the odds I'll be able to get by (and like the results) with one coat?
With either of those, it's up to you and your skills
I don't think you'll have any problems if you use care and some quality tools
Originally Posted by jkozlow3
Are there any better one coat products out there? Keep in mind, I'm only going from white to a light beigeish color.
Ha ha...if there was a guaranteed one coat paint, I'd be all over that lol
Honestly, you should be fine with either of your choices
It's not much of a change in color, really you should be OK
I could do it no problem
Originally Posted by jkozlow3
If I'm going to need 2 coats anyway, maybe I should consider SW's slightly cheaper Classic 99 line?
I'm not familier with that one, but my contemporaries have told me not to use it
So I can't tell you from personal experience
I supect it's the same as the BM lower shelf stuff, and you will need two for sure with that
Originally Posted by jkozlow3
Also, what do you guys recommend for sheen? I DO NOT like glossier paints, so I'd want to go relatively flat. SW Superpaint only comes in Flat & Satin and I'm afraid Satin might be too glossy for my taste. BM adds Eggshell to that list which might be a better choice. Can I use flat throughout the entire house, or do I need to use something slightly glossier in the kitchen & baths?
You can use flat throughout the house
I tend to recommend at least eggshell in high humidity areas or where there is a need for high cleanability, such as kitchens and baths
But you can do what you'd like
It's just not as cleanable or m/m resistent
Originally Posted by jkozlow3
What would YOU do for the different rooms if it were your house? Flat, Eggshell, Satin, and where?
Flat in most rooms
Eggshell in the kitchen and bathroom

The eggshell in the kitchen (Zinsser) is flatter than the eggshell in the bath (BM)
I would have used the Z in the bath (it's an extreme mold/mildew fighter, eggshell is the flattest it comes, but it's pretty flat), but it could not be tinted to the proper color
I am in an extremely damp area, with lots of mold and mildew, and the bath has no fan, so I had to go with a glossier paint
 
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Old 02-20-06, 04:37 PM
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Depending on the manufacture eggshell and satin are fairly close in sheen. The better quality flat paints are washable but not to the extent that an enamel is. SWP has 'everclean' line which also comes in flat and is very washable.

Coverage is different for different grades of paint - usually the better the paint the better it covers. Color also plays a big part in coverage - pinks and yellows always have the poorest coverage properties. A moderate color change combined with quality paint and proper application will usually cover with 1 coat.

Kitchens and especially baths [with shower] should always have enamel on the walls [ceilings too with shower]. Enamel repells moisture better and is easier to clean.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 05:07 PM
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I have not used much BM paint, but Iíve heard only good things about it.

S-W SuperPaint is excellent paint. Duration is S-Wís top-of-the-line interior paint, and one of the best Iíve ever used. However, Duration is pricey. Between the two, SuperPaint may be the best value.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 05:10 PM
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Classic 99 works well on trim . And is average to ok on walls. Everclean is great but I think they stopped making it now that they have Duration interior
 
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Old 02-21-06, 09:22 AM
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Thanks for everyone's help...I just have a couple more questions if you don't mind.

1. The guy at the SW store told me that their Satin & Eggshell are identical and that they just call them differently in their different lines (marketing). Superpaint only comes in Satin. Since many people prefer Eggshell throughout the house and assuming SW's Satin is identical to SW's Eggshell, should I just use Satin throughout the entire house then if I go with Superpaint? It won't look too glossy will it? Or should I use Satin in the kitchen & bath and Flat in the other rooms? I have no kids/pets, so durability isn't a huge issue - but I want what looks best and I also want it to look good when I go to sell the townhome in a couple of years.

2. Here in CO, they seem to use a knockdown finish everywhere. The guy at SW told me that a 1" nap roller is preferable for knockdown. This seems a bit extreme. Does anyone have experience with knockdown?

Thanks again!!
 
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Old 02-21-06, 09:32 AM
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#1 Whether to use flat or satin is a personal choice. Satin does wear and clean better. Straight ahead satin doesn't hardly show a shine but from an angle you can see the sheen.

#2 It all depends on how heavy the texture is. I would think a 3/4" nap would be the one to use but I've not seen your texture. Sight unseen I would think 1" for flat paint and ceilings with 1/2"-3/4" for satin enamel.

Knock down can be a very feint light texture or a very heavy aggresive texture also anywhere inbetween.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 09:40 AM
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I don't know enough to say for certain on the roller nap, but 3/4 - 1" sounds reasonable to me. As far as satin versus flat, there is going to be quite a difference in how they look, so I would suggest trying to see what each looks like on a wall to make your decision - obviously seeing it already done on someone else's walls would be preferable to painting one of each in your own home first.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 11:02 AM
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Check again with your S-W dealer. My S-W dealer sells Superpaint in flat, satin and semi-gloss. As for roller nap, I will yield to Markís vast experience.

Also, S-W sells quart samples (Color To Go) for about $5. They are great for testing colors, but wonít help much in determining the final sheen. When I use the sample paints on poster or illustration board, the sheen of the board affects the sheen of the paint.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 11:27 AM
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To me, the satin doesn't have much sheen at all, just a slight sheen. Its not semi-gloss. I do not care for flat on walls. But this is all personal preference. Your mileage may vary.

Superpaint is good stuff. Classic 99 is much better than anything you get at the big boxes.

All the advice on coverage is right on. I only have one additional comment. If the walls only have the builder's paint on them now, you may find the walls absorbing a lot of paint. In that case, you may need a second coat.

Before investing lots of time and money, why not get a gallon of each, SW in satin, BM in eggshell, and paint one room with the SW and one room with BM. See which you like better. If the sheen is too much, its only one room.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 11:52 AM
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Painting a couple of rooms first, is sage advice.

One more thing... In my experience, a textured wall or ceiling can make satin paint look flatter than it actually is. I just painted a popcorn ceiling in a bathroom with satin paint. To me the ceiling looks like itís pained with flat paint, and it looks nice.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 02:56 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. I think I'll attempt to use the SW Superpaint in Satin since it's supposedly the same as SW's Eggshell and see how it turns out. Hopefully it won't look too glossy on my knockdown textured walls. If so, I'll switch to Flat. I'm DEFINITELY planning on purchasing a few of the $5 quart samples at the SW store before deciding on my final color(s).

Anyone have advice on rollers? I think I'll try the 3/4", but what brand/material should I get? Should I use a new roller each day I paint or should I just get 1-2 good quality rollers and wash/reuse them? Someone here at work said to get a good lambswool roller and just wash/reuse it. Rollers never seemed to look quite right after washing them when I've painted before (although I have not painted much in the past). Opinions?

Thanks!!
 
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Old 02-21-06, 03:11 PM
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I've heard wooster mentioned several times as having the best roller covers. You should be able to clean it and reuse.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 05:27 PM
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I am old school and detest using roller covers that aren't lambswool. A lambswool cover is easier to clean and for me they apply the paint easier and with less roller spray. They do cost a lot more. Used correctly they can last several paint jobs but used incorrectly the ends can be 'burned' off of them in short order rendering them almost useless.

Wooster makes good covers. If not mistaken SWPs brand is sherwood. Most covers sold at a paint store are of good quality. Stay away from any 'bargain basement' type covers.
 
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Old 02-21-06, 07:01 PM
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I have used SW Superpaint Satin in my whole finished basement, master bedroom and 2 other bedrooms. It looks great and is easy to clean up. I love the way it applies.
 
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Old 02-22-06, 06:32 PM
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I usually use the superpaint. SWMBO wanted the dining room walls below the chair rail painted a green. The S-W Cashmere was on sale for the same price as the SP so I tried it. That is one nice paint. It went on very smooth and easy. The finish has a rich look to it.
 
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Old 02-23-06, 10:45 PM
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regal wall satin is $30 dollars a gallon???

oh man, that's a bit steep. If it were me, I would go w/ benmoores regal matte finish. Sheen is somewhere between an eggshell and a flat, but highly scrubbable and touches up well. I know sherwin williams has a similar product(ceramic based paint)... either one would do good.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by noleguy33
regal wall satin is $30 dollars a gallon???

oh man, that's a bit steep.
That's the going rate around here
The SWP is $37 (+/-depending on sheen)
 
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Old 02-25-06, 10:53 AM
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Well I finally found someone who works at SW for the 50% off friends & family special and I bought 20 gallons of Superpaint Satin yesterday for $19/gallon!!

Now, I just need to find the best roller covers for my application. I want good quality rollers that can be washed & reused as I do my entire townhome, don't shed and hold a fair amount of paint.

As mentioned earlier, I think I'll go with 3/4 inch nap for my knockdown textured walls unless someone thinks there is a better length. Lowes sells Wooster rollers, but I don't know what to get - Super/Fab, Pro/Doo-Z, 50/50 (poly/wool), or 100% lambswool??????????

The Wooster website isn't terribly helpful. Any suggestions?

Thanks!!
 
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Old 02-25-06, 11:34 AM
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You'll probably appreciate the 50/50s
You didn't get them from SWP with your discount?
They have some good ones
The Wooster 50/50s are comparable
 
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Old 02-25-06, 06:39 PM
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When I was at the SW store I picked up some 100% Lambswool rollers. I didn't like the SW 50/50's because they seemed very "linty". The SW 100% Lambswool were also on the linty side, but less so than the 50/50's.

I was just at Home Depot for something else and they had Purdy 50/50's that weren't linty at all. I'll check the Wooster 50/50's tomorrow, as I need to grab something at Lowe's in the morning. Are the Woosters generally better than the Purdy, or is it basically a wash?
 
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Old 02-25-06, 07:29 PM
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Purdy and wooster both make good covers. Have you tried the 100% lambs wool? I prefer them, in fact its almost all I use.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 06:33 PM
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I just made an investment in a few Purdy "Pro-Extra" rollers and extension poles. How washable reusable are the Purdy lambs wool roller covers?
 
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Old 02-28-06, 07:31 PM
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Lambs wool covers are very washable and will last a long time if used properly. They are a lot different than synthetic covers. When using a lambs wool cover you should never push down on the cover trying to squeeze paint out on the wall. They release paint well and respond well to a light touch. If you try to press hard while rolling you will wear the cover out and work harder unnecesarrily.

If you can get used to using lambs wool, you'll never want to use synthetic again. As they wear out, they still work well, the only difference being the nap gets shorter. I have never been able to get used to synthetic covers, I dislike them, probably because I learned to roll with lambs wool and never had a desire to learn to use a cover that doesn't preform as well.

Hope you can get adjusted to using lambs wool and enjoy them as much as I have.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
I just made an investment...extension poles.
WBP, are the extention poles adjustable, and if they are do they have a postive lock or a twist lock?
 
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Old 02-28-06, 09:40 PM
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I'm looking forward to using lambs wool roller covers!

The Purdy poles are adjustable with a positive lock (3" or 6") depending on the length of the pole. I prefer a twist lock, and have a few twist lock poles that I really like. But, I guess I can adapt to the positive lock system.

Also, the Purdy rollers use a 1-3/4" cover, not the conventional 1-1/2" cover. So, I may have to use only Purdy roller covers.

Thanks for the feedback!!!
 
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Old 02-28-06, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
The Purdy poles are adjustable with a positive lock (3" or 6") depending on the length of the pole. I prefer a twist lock, and have a few twist lock poles that I really like. But, I guess I can adapt to the positive lock system.
Whew
The twist poles won't hold up to profesional use
Posi-lock is the only way it'll last
If you had said twistie I would have suggested you return them
You may want a two footer, or two foot capability in there (hallways, small baths)
Don't sweat it, if you don't have it now
But keep it in mind as you work
I use the heck out of my 2/3/4 footer
 
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Old 03-01-06, 01:43 PM
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You're right. I've noticed the twist-lock poles do wear out.

I bought the 1-2 foot and the 2-4 foot Purdy extension poles. I'm thinking they will be the most useful. I have a few longer twist lock poles, that I'll need to replace, soon.

Thanks!
 
  #34  
Old 03-01-06, 06:43 PM
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You will probably find that the 2 most used roller poles will be the 2'-4' and 4'-8'

You may find need for a 8'-16' but you will never look forward to using it - unless you really like exercise Both purdy and wooster make good poles.
 
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Old 03-01-06, 06:57 PM
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[QUOTE=Wannabe-A-Pro] I prefer a twist lock, and have a few twist lock poles that I really like. But, I guess I can adapt to the positive lock system.
QUOTE]

The first time your painting using a twist-lock pole with a roller on the end and the thing decides to unlock, and the roller flops paint all over the place, you'l unprefer it real quick. Always good for at least 1/2 hour's worth of cursing....
 
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Old 03-01-06, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Used correctly they can last several paint jobs but used incorrectly the ends can be 'burned' off of them in short order rendering them almost useless.
What does "burned off" mean? Is that when the edges of the roller turn into little hard balls of paint and fibers?

What causes the ends to burn off? How can burn-off be prevented?

One last question, with respect to the SWP Super Paint and Classic 99, where does the Pro-200 fit in? I sprayed a bedroom with it and like the finish, so I rolled a bathroom with it just last week. Probably should have used oil-based, but I didn't feel like priming the whole thing, and I had a fresh gallon of Pro-200 in the garage. At $40 a gallon, have to be somewhat frugal...
 
  #37  
Old 03-01-06, 07:39 PM
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Lambswool fibers aren't as durable as synthetic fibers, if you press to hard on the roller with lambswool you are apt to wear it down. Some people press hard on a roller to squeeze out more paint if this is done with lambs wool it usually wears the ends out leaving you with a cover that is still good in the middle but with wore out areas the roller is no good. Using a light touch, reloading the roller often both extends the life of the cover and makes rolling easier.

Promar is SWPs contractor line, they have promar 700, 400 & 200. Promar 200 is their best paint in this line. Probably not as good as super paint but I don't know for sure. I do know that on new construction promar 200 is better than what the majority of painters use. Better paint makes for a better loooking job which makes me look like a better painter
 
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Old 03-02-06, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Pipsisiwah
The first time your painting using a twist-lock pole with a roller on the end and the thing decides to unlock, and the roller flops paint all over the place, you'l unprefer it real quick. Always good for at least 1/2 hour's worth of cursing....
Yes, I'm now convinced that positive-lock poles are the way to go. The only aspect of the twist lock that I like is the variable adjustment. But, I'm going to replace all my twist locks.
 
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Old 03-02-06, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
You will probably find that the 2 most used roller poles will be the 2'-4' and 4'-8'

You may find need for a 8'-16' but you will never look forward to using it - unless you really like exercise Both purdy and wooster make good poles.

The 4-8 foot pole is next on my shopping list. I don't look forward to using poles longer than 8 feet. I have a 12 footer, but using it fully extended is hard work.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-02-06, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
You will probably find that the 2 most used roller poles will be the 2'-4' and 4'-8'
Oh Yeah, definately
 
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