Filling nail holes in trim


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Old 03-14-06, 11:11 AM
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Filling nail holes in trim

I have a job that involves paining new trim (pre-primed). The carpenter didn't bother to fill the nail holes or caulk the edges (how convenient). Is it better to fill the holes with caulk or putty?
 
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Old 03-14-06, 12:45 PM
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We don't do that, it is the painter's job. I defer to the painters experience and preferences. I wouldn't want to put something on there that is inferior or incompatable with his paint, stain, etc.

If there is not a professional painter following me when I do trim, I will caulk and fill, but homie's going to pay a little more. I use Alex plus white caulk and that lightweight spackle stuff for the nail holes. It seems to work well.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 02:13 PM
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kona hit the nail on the head

That's your job WBP

You wouldn't want kona using an unpaintable caulk and a putty for oil when you are supposed to use a latex on that trim now would ya?
lol

Although I always appreciate it when those are done (which is not very often), it's usually just as well if the painter does it
I have had guys check with me if I'm on site though, that's pretty cool
 
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Old 03-14-06, 03:24 PM
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After reconsideration, I agree it's best for the painter to caulk and fill the trim.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 05:51 PM
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Usually a painter is better trained to do the caulking and puttying. I would rather do it myself than to straighten out what someone else messed up.

You don't want to use caulking for nail holes - use painters putty, even glazing will work. Spackling works but isn't the ideal product for this.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 07:38 PM
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Caulk has a tendency to shrink. Painter's putty sounds good.

Thanks!!
 
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Old 03-16-06, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Usually a painter is better trained to do the caulking and puttying. I would rather do it myself than to straighten out what someone else messed up.

You don't want to use caulking for nail holes - use painters putty, even glazing will work. Spackling works but isn't the ideal product for this.
Should the painter's putty be spot primed?
 
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Old 03-16-06, 04:28 PM
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If you are using quality enamel it shouldn't need priming. It will bleed on some cheap latex paints.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 04:58 PM
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Thanks! I'm using good SW paint.

I only use top-shelf paint, unless the customer insists on cheap paint, in which case, they will get what they asked for... with no guarantees.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
... unless the customer insists on cheap paint, in which case, they will get what they asked for... with no guarantees.
They call him "Mr. Waiver"
lol
 
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Old 03-19-06, 01:01 PM
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I'm sure I will be introducing Mr. Waiver to some of my customers.

I tried two different brands of painter's putty on the nail holes, but they were both hard to work with – too thick. Thickness wouldn't be problem, if I were only filling a few holes. However, I've estimated there are more than six hundred holes to fill. The painter's putty I have would take forever, and both products recommend priming with an oil-based primer. I guess painter's putty could be thinned with mineral spirits, but I don't think I want to try that because I would still need to prime.

Today, I found a product a Lowes made by Elmer's called "Carpenter's Wood Filler." It come in a tube and is a lot softer than putty. Elmer's this claims product is shrink-free, can be sanded and painted with water-base paint after two hours, and doesn't require priming.

Has anyone used this product or a similar product?
 
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Old 03-19-06, 02:10 PM
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I don't leave home w/o it
Seriously
I didn't know it came in tubes, I use little tubs
That stuff will hold screws
I don't know about priming, I always have
It will/should need sanding, and I probably wouldn't use it for nail holes
But really I'm never, ever w/o some

I didn't know big blue had it, it's usually not in big boxes, and sometimes can be hard to find

I'm not sure why your putty is so tough, it shouldn't be
What kind are you using?

If it's pre-primed or a re-paint, I'll often use Elmer's latex "spackle"
Have you tried that?
It's soft and can be made softer with water
 
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Old 03-19-06, 03:03 PM
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When putty gets old sometimes you need to add a few drops of thinner to make it workable.
 
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Old 03-19-06, 05:21 PM
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I tried something made by DAP. I don't remember the other brand, but I got from SW. It may be an SW product.

I guess it would be best to prime the patches just to be sure.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 01:01 PM
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I prefer to use SWPs 66 glazing in place of putty. 1 can in the van and I can use it for putty or reglazing windows. It isn't near as gooey as the other brands and I don't recall ever having a problem with it bleeding through a coat of finish paint.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
I prefer to use SWPs 66 glazing in place of putty.
Would that be any relation to DAPs '33' window glazing?
 
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Old 03-20-06, 02:00 PM
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I don't think so. The thing I like about it is besides working well it doesn't get your fingers all gooey and messy. It also seems to last longer in the can.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 04:01 PM
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I'll try SWP 66. Thanks!
 
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Old 03-20-06, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
I'll try SWP 66. Thanks!
Me too
I'm going to pick up a can
I've been using more SWP products lately, as the local retailer seems to be very contractor service oriented
I'll give it a go
Thanks marksr
 
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Old 03-21-06, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I've been using more SWP products lately, as the local retailer seems to be very contractor service oriented
Yes, the SWP folks are great, and so are their products!

I tried SWP 66 today. It’s definitely easier to work with than the painter’s putties I’ve tried.

However, latex caulk seems to work best for me in my situation, even though I need two coats due to shrinkage. I pump caulk into a can and use it like putty.

Also, I neglected to mention that the trim was not nailed in the grooves. The carpenter nailed on the ”flat” surfaces, so the nail holes are very noticeable. If the holes were in the grooves (where they should be), glazing putty would probably work well.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 06:06 PM
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Putty is still better than caulk for nail holes. Work your putty [or 66 glazing] and roll it up into a small ball, then press and twist as you force the putty into the nail hole. The correct way is to then smooth and remove the excess with your putty knife. With practice you can use your thumb instead of the putty knife as it is a lot faster.

BTW I prefer for the nails to be set in the flat area as opposed to the grooves - I can putty faster/easier when I don't have to mess with the groove.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 06:34 PM
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I'm sure putty is better, but I need to work on my technique. I was in a jam and caulk was working for me. I appreciate your advice!!
 
 

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