Smell of oil-based paint


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Old 03-15-06, 09:35 AM
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Question Smell of oil-based paint

Hi,

I have moved in to this 5-year-old house for 8 months. The walls in the master bedroom were painted with an oil-based paint before we moved in. Even today, I can still smell the annoying paint smell. What can be wrong with this? Would re-painting the walls with latex paint remove the smell? Any other ways to get rid of the smell? Any suggestion is appreciated.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 10:30 AM
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Are you sure?
That would be unusual
Have you done the test in the sticky up top?

If it is oil, as I mentioned that would be unusual, and probably a sign that the room was fire damaged
Is that something you are aware of happening before you moved in?
 
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Old 03-15-06, 11:42 AM
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Thank you for your reply, slickshift.

Yes, I am sure it's oil-based.

I am not aware of any fire damage to the room or the house. Is there any sign that I can look for to identify any such damage?

Regardless of the cause, what can I do to get rid of the smell? Thanks.

Originally Posted by slickshift
Are you sure?
That would be unusual
Have you done the test in the sticky up top?

If it is oil, as I mentioned that would be unusual, and probably a sign that the room was fire damaged
Is that something you are aware of happening before you moved in?
 
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Old 03-15-06, 05:16 PM
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Oil base primer is normally used to seal smoke and fire damage. Years ago pigmented shellac was used which smells even worse. Look in the attic and see if it is painted. With fire and smoke damage everything has to be sealed in order to lock in the smoke smell and stains. You could also ask neighbors if they know off any fire damage.

It may just be that they either bought the wrong paint or used what was handy. Fresh air circulation is really the only way to remove the paint odor. If it is indeed oil base paint you will need to prime it with a solvent based primer before applying latex.

Some people are super sensitive to paint smells, I believe you are one since the paint job is atleast 8 months old. Sorry we don't have a quick easy solution for you.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 01:16 AM
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Thank you for your insights, Marksr.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 03:40 AM
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I had my whole house repainted (new colors) about six months ago and made sure to buy oil based paint. It is far superior in every way to water based, except for the smell. One thing I can say is that it took almost forever for the smell to go away, and that's having fresh air circulate throughout me home as often as possible. It even takes months to cure. I bought satin oil based and it looked like gloss for the first few months, then low gloss and now (after six months) it's looking like satin. I'd open all the windows for as long and often as you can. See how it is a month later.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Fresh air circulation is really the only way to remove the paint odor.
Some people are super sensitive to paint smells
Sorry we don't have a quick easy solution for you.
I would agree
Sorry there's no quick fix
Fresh air is pretty much it

But hey at least it's spring now!
Open up those door and windows!

(lol-it's still below freezing at night here)
 
 

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