How to tell if wall is primed


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Old 03-24-06, 11:15 AM
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Red face How to tell if wall is primed

Hi! I've just joined this forum having found the site a few minutes ago. I have looked around and believe I'll be returning for help from time to time.
Anyway, I have plans to paint and the walls had wallpaper on them, which I've stripped off (almost finished). I don't have much experience with this, but I know that walls need to be repaired and prepared before they can be painted. I plan to fill holes and there are a lot of them. I just don't know if the walls have already been primed and have no idea how to tell. Of course I would just like to paint and not have to spend so much time doing it right, but I do want to do it right. I don't know if what I'm looking at, now that the wallpaper and most of the glue is gone, is primed wall. Is there a way to know?
I appreciate any help I can get.


Sincerely,
La'Trice
 
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Old 03-24-06, 03:35 PM
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If the walls didn't have any primer on them you would have had a terrible time removing the wallpaper. If you have any areas where the drywall paper has come off these areas should be primed before repairing. Once you have made all the repairs and sanded them you will need to prime the walls.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
. If you have any areas where the drywall paper has come off these areas should be primed before repairing.
Mark, I've always just mudded over these spots? Whats the theory behind priming first?

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 04:06 PM
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If only a little paper is missing you can usually get by without priming. The problem arises when large areas are missing paper, requiring a large amount of mud to repair - the moisture in the mud can sometimes disolve the gypsum and the repair may bubble [especially around the edges]
 
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Old 03-24-06, 06:10 PM
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Technically the proper way to repair is prime, mud, prime
It's very common to find the first prime step skipped
But unless it's very small repair areas, it's best not to skip the step
Adhesion, bubbles, it's better to do it right and prime first
 
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Old 03-25-06, 04:34 PM
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If you have any deeper tears in the drywall facing, other than just a little minor rip, I would seal it up first before making your repairs and then follow with a good primer after all your other stuff is repaired. you could use zinsser's guardz, scotch draw-tite, or sher. Will. also has a dry wall conditioner for damaged drywall.

You also mentioned, "Most of the glue is gone", well, I would make sure I could get as much off and cleaned and rinsed "thourghly" , make all your repairs , and if there are any residue left , JMHO, I would opt for a oil base primer , following with your waterborne paints.

You also mentioned , "you wanted to do it right", well, prep, prep, prep is the KEY word here and you should be in the ballpark for a nice finish.
good luck.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 04:56 PM
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Thanks!

It took me a while to find the replies, I was beginning to think there weren't any!

Well, you all sure came through for me! I really do appreciate all the help! So much I don't know.

I've got my work cut out for me. I'm looking forward to getting to it, it's about time.

Thank you all so much!

La'Trice
 
 

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