Best primer/paint for a shed interior that might get wet


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Old 03-31-06, 07:13 AM
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Best primer/paint for a shed interior that might get wet

I'm building a shed under an elevated deck. Because of limited height I can't build a traditional roof on the shed that I know won't leak. Instead I'm installing corrugated roofing.

So I'm afraid it's possible the roof may leak during rain with high winds, etc.

In that case, should I use outdoor primer/paints inside the shed?

Would oil based products be better? Or for occassional moisture latex would be better because it would dry out better?
 
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Old 03-31-06, 09:56 AM
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Exterior paint would be a good idea. I would use oil primer.
 
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Old 03-31-06, 11:17 AM
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I was under the impression that the primary difference between exterior and interior paints was UV protection and durability under sun exposed conditions.Since this does not seem to be an issue in this situation I believe interior products formulated for use in kitchens and bathrooms (such as the Zinsser product) with specific mildew resisting characteristics might do a better job.I do agree with oil based primer.Perhaps some of the pros who frequent this board could weigh in.
 
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Old 03-31-06, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by walkman
...should I use outdoor primer/paints inside the shed?
Yes, I would
Originally Posted by walkman
Would oil based products be better?
Yes
They are superior
Don't get me wrong, latex has come a long way
But it still is not nearly up to oil for lasting exterior protection
Originally Posted by walkman
Or for occasional moisture latex would be better because it would dry out better?
Mmmmm....I'm not sure what you mean, but I think you're on the wrong track
If I was painting a damp basement floor I'd use latex because oil would never cure (oil+water=not)

Latex doesn't dry faster though
 
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Old 03-31-06, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by spdavid
I was under the impression that the primary difference between exterior and interior paints was UV protection and durability under sun exposed conditions.
It's an important difference, but not the only one
Temperature is a biggie, weather exposure like sun, rain, snow, wind, dew...
Damp dew that freezes....frosty mornings that turn foggy then hit 55* with full sun-in a few hours
Interior paints do not need to be made to deal with these
 
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Old 03-31-06, 03:13 PM
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I would add that oil base paints repel water better than latex. If the substrate is damp use latex - it may stick to a damp surface, oil WILL NOT

Most exterior paints already have more mildewcide built in the formula than interior paints do.

BTW slickshifts remark about oil base being superior to latex is only true regionally. In the deep south a good latex paint will outlast oil many times. The intense sun detriates oil base paint. I assume this may be true in other regions as well. That is why painting practices can vary so much from one region to another.
 
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Old 03-31-06, 08:06 PM
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I'm using T-111 for siding on the shed. I've heard that this is a very porous wood that can soak up a lot of water. Since I can't guarantee that water won't get into the wood, it's been recommended that I use an acrylic stain on the outside of the shed as it will allow any moisture that gets into the wood to evaporate, whereas oil based stain would trap the water and eventually lead to peeling.

Based on the responses it sounds like it would also probably be a good idea to use a wb exterior primer and paint on the inside.

Sound reasonable?

p.s. I live in Georgia so it doesn't get below freezing very often, and the shed is under a deck so it won't get direct sun.
 
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Old 04-01-06, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by walkman
I'm using T-111 for siding on the shed.
Ah, that's different

It sounds like you have a good plan
 
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Old 04-01-06, 06:59 AM
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T-111 manufactures recomend you use paint not stain. Stain doesn't give enough protection for plywood. If you can prime the T-111 before it gets wet I would use oil primer, other wise use latex.
 
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Old 04-01-06, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by walkman
Based on the responses it sounds like it would also probably be a good idea to use a wb exterior primer and paint on the inside.
Somehow I read that as using a latex paint on the exterior
Originally Posted by walkman
...I use an acrylic stain on the outside of the shed

I missed that
-It was pre-coffee

Originally Posted by marksr
T-111 manufactures recomend you use paint not stain
I'm not aware of any that you can stain
 
 

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