Stain Bleeding Through Latex Kilz


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Old 04-04-06, 11:10 AM
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Question Stain Bleeding Through Latex Kilz

Hi All,

I'm having a problem painting over my front doors (they are oak). The doors were stained at one time, but the prior owner of the house never did any sealing/polyurethane/etc. We also have a lot of cats in the neighborhood, and they have "marked" the outside of the door many, many times, and the urine has soaked into the wood. There was no way to salvage the doors by restaining and sealing. The stains were just too deep. They had to be painted.

The door itself is not directly exposed to rain or sun.

Anyway, after reading on some other painting forum somewhere, I decided to use Kilz to paint over the existing stain. However, I've been using Kilz 2, the latex-based one, and the stain seems to be "leaking" through -- the paint starts out super white in color, but after about a minute, it's a light tan color. I have painted the door multiple times now, and while it is therapeudic as a kind of zen-like experience, I have no wish to make it go on for years like it's threatening to.

My question is: should I continue with this treatment in the hopes that the stain will eventually be blocked, or should I try something else? And what should I try? I don't think I'll be able to get the Kilz off before trying something new (there's a lot of detailed trim work on the door), so whatever any new treatment might be, it'll have to go over the current Kilz/stain mixture.

Thanks to everyone in advance!
 
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Old 04-04-06, 11:19 AM
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have you actually tried paint or just the primer? Kiltz is not paint. It is what's known as a pigmented primer. The color in it is really just to show you where you have been. I would try to paint (with paint not primer) a small area to see if it will block the stain. If not I might try something more aggressive like an oil pased primer
 
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Old 04-04-06, 12:17 PM
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I would switch to the oil based ext. stain blocking primers made by Zinsser.Right this moment I can't remember which one is exterior useable but it will say so on the label.These are superior stain blockers to latex Kilz.Qualified help at a hardware store or paint store can help you pick the right product.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 12:19 PM
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Kilz also makes an exterior oil-based primer.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 01:38 PM
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Latex stain hiding primers are marginal at best, oil base primer is a lot better. Very stubborn stains require the use of a pigmented shellac primer.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 03:08 PM
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I prefer a couple coats of Zinnser. Works like a charm to prevent stain bleed through.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 05:55 PM
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Just had the exact same problem with interior window casings. Came through 2 coats of latex zinzer and 1 coat of paint.

I used the oil based zinsser and it worked first time.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 07:19 PM
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Most latex "stain-sealers" aren't particularly well suited for the job
An oil based sealer, such as Original Kilz is better

However, on stains like that I would use nothing less then Zinsser's BIN, a shellac-based sealer
It is a bit nasty, so use a respirator and plenty of fresh air
But it will seal it like nothing else

It's the only thing I'll use on pet/pest stains like that
It's pretty much the best
 
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Old 04-04-06, 09:35 PM
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Thumbs up

Wow. Thank you all so much. Never thought I'd get so many answers so quickly! forum.doityourself.com rules!! I will NEVER go anywhere else.
 
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Old 04-05-06, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by mjd2k
I used the oil based zinsser and it worked first time.
I checked the can and it was BIN. I think slick or mark had suggested that on a previous post.
 
 

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