Cleaning cooking oil off latex paint


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Old 04-13-06, 11:33 AM
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Cleaning cooking oil off latex paint

My kitchen ceiling was spattered with cooking oil - yeah, I know hot oil and water don't mix but stuff happens. The ceiling was just recently painted with a latex based, flat white paint and I don't want to redo the whole thing (280 s/f). The ceiling is smooth drywall.
I've tried a couple of mild detergents with a scrub pad w/o success (although I think I removed some of the paint) and unless someone knows a cleaner that will work, I want to paint just the damaged area (3-4 s/f).
I suspect that if I try using the same latex ceiling paint, the cooking oil will just bleed through. However, I'm concerned if I use another type of paint (oil based primer?) the repair will be just as noticeable as the damage.
Any suggestions?
 
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Old 04-13-06, 11:47 AM
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It is possible that the stains may come through the paint but I would probably try just touching it up with the ceiling paint first.

If the oil does bleed through, prime with a solvent based primer [oil or shellac] and then repaint the affected area with your ceiling paint. Of all ceiling types the slick finish ceilings are the hardest to touch up as some brands of paint t/up better than others. The use of primer shouldn't affect the blending in of the paint although the spots that are sealed with the primer will take longer to dry.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 02:34 PM
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Mark - Thanks for the response. I'll try touch up tonight and if that doesn't work I'll hit it with an oil based primer tomorrow night.

An off topic question _ I was watching a "TV court" show where a home owner was refusing partial payment to a paint contractor because he said the contractor breeched the contract. One of his complaints was that the contractor tinted the primer so that he only had to use one cover coat. IYO is this practice common or ethical. I can't decide.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 03:54 PM
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Primer is almost always tinted if it will speed up production. IMO there is nothing wrong with it. Whether or not it would count as 1 coat of paint would depend how the contract was written.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 02:54 PM
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mark
would a tinted oil based primer be
comparable to a tinted oil based
final coat paint product?
in regards to durability.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 04:00 PM
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Hi Mark - Thanks for the paint advice. It took two coats but it did the job.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by leewaytoo
would a tinted oil based primer be
comparable to a tinted oil based
final coat paint product?
in regards to durability.
Not even close
Primers make very bad top coats, on many levels
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by leewaytoo
mark
would a tinted oil based primer be
comparable to a tinted oil based
final coat paint product?
in regards to durability.
I'm not sure what you mean. Primers are formulated to bond or seal while top coats are formulated for wear. Solvent based paints seal and protect better than latex [something about molecules being closer together] Latex will give a little and is better for surfaces that migh expand and contract with temp changes.

Latex paint is a lot better than it used to be but solvent finishes dry to provide a harder finish.

Primers often don't tint as well as the finish paint. They don't have the different bases necesarry to color well. The only reason primer is tinted is to make the next coat cover better.
 
 

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