What is the problem? Wall paint is showing two different colors ...


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Old 04-14-06, 04:11 AM
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What is the problem? Wall paint is showing two different colors ...

Hi,

My wife and I have been painting the living room using a brownish/tan latex (Olympic latex eggshell). It seems like it is applying two different colors. We first do the whole walls and such, without going all the way up to the ceiling edges, once we are thru with the bottom portion of the walls, we grab a ladder to do the edges. Well, thus far our area close to the edge have been coming out much lighter, than the area at the bottom
What is causing this? is this a case of us needing 2 or 3 more coats? better paint?

This picture probably explains it better
I know, I know... it looks horrible!
Thanks
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:32 AM
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YIKES!!

I worked for a contractor years ago that used some cut rate paint on an apartment complex that did the same thing [except it was ext. stucco] So it is possible it is the paint. Was the can mixed well?

#1 rule of painting is to cut in the wall first and then roll, preferably while the cut in is still wet. While it doesn't hurt to cut in last on primer or first coats the finish coat of paint should always be cut and then rolled.

If you have plenty of paint left over, go ahead and cut and roll another coat. When rolling try to roll as close to the ceiling and other edges as possible. You may even want to take and turn the roller sideways to get closer to the ceiling.

If you need to buy more paint I would suggest going to a paint store [not dept] Most paint stores will custom match a competitors color for no extra charge, just bring the paint with you.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:43 AM
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Not only will a paint store color match, they'll usually provide samples and the advice they give is expert advice unlike the advice you are likely to get from the big box store.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:52 AM
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We think it might indeed be the paint. We were sitting, thinking about it, and realized that the portions close to the ceilings happened to be done with a different can of paint, since the previous was done with. We're thinking that it perhaps was mixed differently.
Yes, it was purchased at big home improvement store... but like I said, we've never had issues before. We've done bedrooms, office, bathrooms etc...
 
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Old 04-14-06, 05:55 AM
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Whenever you buy multiple gallons they should be mixed together before applying to assure uniformity.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Whenever you buy multiple gallons they should be mixed together before applying to assure uniformity.
Meaning, we should have probably mixed them all in a bucket before we used them?
That would have been smart. I'm also realizing that this is the first time we've hade to use multiple gallons. You live and you learn
Question: If we do mix the all the gallons together, can we after that pour the mixture back in the containers, or do we need to use it all up immediately.

Thanks again guys. I probably should have done more research prior to taking on the task.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 08:39 AM
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First off you should stir mixed paint thoroughly and often as you paint bringing up settling pigments etc.Then as you use down each can once there is room in the can pour some of another can of the same paint in and stir.You do not have to pour all the cans into one container but you should follow a pattern of intermixing as you go along and stir stir stir.Also never completely use up a can of mixed paint so that you end up stopping in the middle of a wall etc and then start using a different can of mixed paint.You'll end up with a point where you can see even minute differences....there again intermix and stir.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 01:49 PM
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if your paint job is going to take multiple gallons,
why not do as mark has suggested previously.
use a clean 5 gal. bucket
a roller screen that hangs on the inside of the
bucket. no trays to buy and worry about kicking over.
nor having to clean. paint drips back into bucket.

add your paint and stir
and off you go.
any leftover paint, back into a gallon container.

if you need three gallons, maybe buy your paint
in a five gallon container, for having extra
for touchups and such is good.
stir and pour into your clean five gallon bucket.

ask for a 5 gallon stir stick.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 11:27 PM
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I have found I don't need to get too complicated. As Mark said....I use a process. Once I use half a gallon, I stir up a new gallon really well and mix the new gallon with the existing a couple times.

I mainly worry about this most on the second coat cause I'm not too worried if the first coat is a little off..........but I'm not a pro who is providing a warranty....but I did get burned earlier this year........my cut-ins were off a shade or two in a bedroom. Just reminded me to mix...mix.. and mix....lucky I'm not a pro or I would have fired myself.

When I was a teenager, I worked at Simpsons in the hardware dept mixing paint. I screwed up the pigment mixture many times...........its going to happen.

Looking at your picture... thats a strange cut-in pattern. Almost looks like a second coat applied without cutting in on the second coat. I would bet one more coat, with a cut-in would solve your problem.
 

Last edited by mjd2k; 04-14-06 at 11:39 PM.
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Old 04-15-06, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by mjd2k
I use a process. Once I use half a gallon, I stir up a new gallon really well and mix the new gallon with the existing a couple times. .


The only problem with doing it this way is if the other gallon [s] is off, once you are done and find theat you need to touch up a spot done with the first gallon it might not match.

Whenever using multiple gallons on a finish coat it is best to box [mix] them together. Although mis tints can happen anywhere they are less likely to make it out the door at a real paint store.
 
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Old 04-15-06, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
The only problem with doing it this way is if the other gallon [s] is off, once you are done and find theat you need to touch up a spot done with the first gallon it might not match.
Good point. It hasn't happened yet but it could.
 
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Old 04-15-06, 08:38 PM
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My first thought when seeing the picture was two different cans. Not only two different cans, but two different colors!

A room usually only needs two gallons for one coat. Get a paint pail - you should never dip the brush into the paint can itself except to get the last few brushfuls out.

Just open both cans. Pour about half a can into the pail, then pour half of the pother on top of it. Then pour the rest of the first can into the second. Pour about half of the pail into the second can. Do this a couple times.
 
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Old 04-16-06, 05:54 AM
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"Just open both cans. Pour about half a can into the pail, then pour half of the pother on top of it. Then pour the rest of the first can into the second. Pour about half of the pail into the second can. Do this a couple times"

"a can" = 1 ga.
"Pother" = 1 ga.

half and half equal 1 ga.

how can you "Pour about half of the pail into the second can"
if the second can or "pother" is one ga. and you have
already added half of the first to the second half?

seems like if you just poured everything into a five ga.
bucket and stirred, your probs are over, as long as
you stirred occasionaly, didnt kick over the bucket, or
dropped your glasses into the bucket, or forgot to
tie your shoe laces, you know stuff like that.
 
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Old 04-16-06, 12:55 PM
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Using a 5 gal bucket is the easiest way to mix multiple gallons. Bob was trying to explain how to mix 2 gallons without using a 5 gal bucket. Intermixing 2 gallons using 3 gallon cans will work it just takes a little longer.
 
 

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