Scaffolding for two-story homes


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Old 04-19-06, 02:48 PM
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Scaffolding for two-story homes

As an amateur, I used ladders for the high work, but now I think I may need scaffolding to speed up the process. There seems to be a lot of different types of scaffolding available. What's the best type for exterior painting on two-story homes?
 
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Old 04-19-06, 06:36 PM
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I don't do enough exterior work to warrant scaffolding, but that in itself is somewhat telling, so I thought I'd reply

It most of the exteriors I do, scaffolding would only work for part of the job

I could use a scaffolding for a job I'm on now, but unless I had a bunch for all four sides, I'd spend more time breaking down, moving, and setting up, then painting
 
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Old 04-20-06, 09:31 AM
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Thanks!

Yeah, I was thinking the time needed to set up and break down scaffolding could be prohibitive. I've seen guys using two Little Giant ladders with a plank between them as a "scaffold." It seems the LG ladders would be easier to move around, but walking a plank without a guardrail does not appeal to me.

For now, I'll probably stick with extension ladders.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 12:55 PM
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With the exception of an odd job requiring scafolding I rarely ever use them. As noted set up and tear down take too much time although I am never adverse to using a scaffold already set up by another trade.

I doubt that you would ever need scaffolding often enough to pay for it and you can rent them on the odd occasion it is needed.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
I've seen guys using two Little Giant ladders with a plank between them as a "scaffold."
Any two stepladders will work
 
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Old 04-22-06, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I could use a scaffolding for a job I'm on now...
Any two stepladders will work
Ha ha
I put a plank over two stepladders to get to the front trim-my stepladders wouldn't go over the bushes there w/o damaging them

I came back this week, the H/O ripped out the bushes
You'd think that'd be good, but now there's three foot deep holes in front of the house, so I really need the plank on the stepladders
....he used the plank to build a walkway over the hole in front of the front door
....lol
 
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Old 04-22-06, 02:36 PM
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It's always something...

Setting up ladders on uneven or soft ground is a problem. Maybe you could use some planks and/or thick plywood to cover the holes.

I have a Little Giant ladder. It's a real nice piece of equipment but it's heavy. I should have gone for a lighter model. I've already strained my back a few times using it.

I'm gonna try the "plank and ladder" method with regular step-ladders, but I guess I'll need to come up with a way to secure the planks to the ladders.
 
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Old 04-22-06, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
...I guess I'll need to come up with a way to secure the planks to the ladders.
I always have a few of these in the van:


image courtesy of irwin


Originally Posted by Wannabe-A-Pro
Maybe you could use some planks and/or thick plywood to cover the holes.
I'm almost done
Just one more coat (the 5th)
I don't want to go and buy some more planks lol
 
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Old 04-22-06, 06:01 PM
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Not sure if you've ever seen ladder jacks, but they hook onto the rungs of an extension ladder and provide a platform for a plank to sit on.

As I recall from a safety training class I took in Chicago, OSHA prohibits the use of ladder jacks over 16' off the ground. At that point, they recommend steel sectional scaffolding.

Pump jacks are another option, although an expensive one. Not sure what OSHA says about them as far as height limitations without fall protection.

For walk planks that are only 8' high and on uneven ground, Tapco Bronco work horses are awesome! They have 3 adjustable legs that enable you to set up a level scaffold on any terrain. I don't even carry stepladders in the van anymore since I got two pair of Broncos.
 
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Old 04-22-06, 06:51 PM
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I just thought of this... one day I saw a painter at a gas station painting the "carport" cover over the gas pumps. He was painting inside a bucket... the kind of hydraulic buckets that the cable company uses. I thought that would be pretty slick- to just be able to move the bucket around to where you needed to be. Hard part is getting your van into someone's backyard. LOL
 
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Old 04-23-06, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
...I saw a painter at a gas station painting the "carport" cover over the gas pumps. He was painting inside a bucket... the kind of hydraulic buckets that the cable company uses. I thought that would be pretty slick- to just be able to move the bucket around to where you needed to be...
I've rented, and can recommend the cherry pickers
They have out-door/in-door ones, push-around ones that fit in a pick-up, and drive-around ones that you can tow
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
For walk planks that are only 8' high and on uneven ground, Tapco Bronco work horses are awesome!
Thanks for the great tips!!!
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I've rented, and can recommend the cherry pickers
They have out-door/in-door ones, push-around ones that fit in a pick-up, and drive-around ones that you can tow
I could really use a small electric "man lift" for some jobs, but I haven't found any in my area small enough for indoor residential use. But, there are plenty of industrial-sized lifts around.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I always have a few of these in the van:


image courtesy of irwin
I just put these on my shopping list! Thanks!
 
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Old 04-24-06, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
For walk planks that are only 8' high and on uneven ground, Tapco Bronco work horses are awesome! They have 3 adjustable legs that enable you to set up a level scaffold on any terrain. I don't even carry stepladders in the van anymore since I got two pair of Broncos.
How are the planks attached to the work horses?
 
 

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