Need a spray gun for painting trim / doors


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Old 04-19-06, 06:41 PM
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Need a spray gun for painting trim / doors

I am remodeling my home and am looking for a spray gun to do all my new trim and doors with. I will be putting on latex paint on all items. What type of gun should I get?

HVLP, GRAVITY FEED, cup, paint pot?

Just to many to pick from. Also, what size tip should I use to spray latex?

Thanks

Bill
 
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Old 04-20-06, 01:06 PM
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Gravity feed, pressure pot or cup gun are not suitable for spraying latex. Not all HVLPs will spray latex. An airless is the type of sprayer used for latex. I usually use a 4-15 or 4-13 to spray doors, it can also be done with a smaller 4-11 or 3-11 tip.

If the home is occupied I wouldn't recomend spraying. I almost always spray the doors on new homes but usually brush or roll and tip out w/brush on repaints.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 04:15 PM
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I also would not recommend spraying for this project
 
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Old 04-20-06, 09:37 PM
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None of the doors are hanging and I have not put up any of the trim yet. I would be spraying them in my shop outside of the home.
 
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Old 04-21-06, 03:08 AM
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An airless is best for latex
@ 800 bucks + for a decent one, and 400 bucks for a "Handyman/Homeowner" one, I'm still recommending doing it by hand
You can rent one for 50-75 a day
You'd have to have a few doors to make that worth it
...how many doors are we talking about?
If it's a lot it might be worth it
 
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Old 04-21-06, 06:45 AM
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8 doors plus casing for each. and base for 2 rooms
 
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Old 04-21-06, 08:38 AM
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I agree with slickshift that you would be better off with a brush and roller. Overspray tends to go everywhere so even if you're spraying in your shop anything you don't want paint on would have to be covered. Base and casing can be painted realitively fast by hand when utilizing saw horses.
 
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Old 04-22-06, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by billkater
8 doors plus casing for each. and base for 2 rooms
For me, professionally, if you contracted me to paint 8 doors, they'd have to be pretty fancy (read: very difficult or time-consuming to paint...8-panel doors, 15-pane window doors, etc....) for me to even consider renting a sprayer to paint them
Even then it's not a given
...and remember I have a set price, so the quicker I paint them, and get them back up, the more I make "per hour" so to speak

That may not sound important to a DIYer, but most don't really want to spend more time then they have to with these DIY projects
(ie: do you want to spend a week doing it or a day and a half)

If I did decide to spray them, I have a Cover-It (a fabric building) separate from my shop that I would use as a spray booth
They would then be set up so I could paint both sides

Anything not pertaining to spraying would be removed from the Cover-it, as the overspray gets onto everything...everything

I guess I'm just trying to spell it out here
As far as time and expenses go, if I would need something really major to tip the balance in favor of spraying this project (and I'm kinda set up for this type of thing here-and have experience with sprayers), I really can't recommend that a DIYer spray it
 
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Old 04-22-06, 07:03 PM
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I've had great success painting new doors and trim with your run-of-the-mill Wagner power painter. I use a high gloss latex paint made by Lucite which sprays well without being thinned. My favorite doors to paint are the preprimed "cardboard" doors. On doors, I spray horizontally for the first coat, then vertically for the second coat to eliminate any lap marks.

Spraying latex with a suction sprayer is difficult, but not impossible. You have to thin the paint with Flotrol to the proper consistancy, and even then it can appear "spattery" due to the mixing of air and atomized paint. 2 thin finish coats work better than one thick coat, I've found.

The problem with spraying latex paints is usually adhesion. Latex paint bonds best when it's brushed in, as opposed to being sprayed on.
 
 

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